Career Change Advice

johnnycando

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You’re correct. Right now I work in healthcare compliance and I’m looking to transition either into law practice or into financial advising. Ideally there is something in between. The problem is that all my professional experiences is in healthcare compliance and operations...as is my masters degree.

I put in my notice because my boss is a micromanager and I have zero passion for what I do anymore. I also feel I’m being discriminated against by things she’s said and done related to my taking days off when my kids have been sick, etc. Today one of my coworkers told me that our work environment is “toxic” and that I’m just the first to leave. I’ve decided to put my family, happiness, and mental health ahead of this job.

I was just looking for some help from anyone who has done a career change. Very much not a joke.

Broseph I left the Nuke industry and went into Oil and Gas.

I couldn’t be happier. Initially it was a pay cut.

Now it’s far and beyond what I was making.

Go for something and be passionate. You’ll promote into pay.

Lastly, job satisfaction means so much to a man. Find it.
 

Greenore

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You’re correct. Right now I work in healthcare compliance and I’m looking to transition either into law practice or into financial advising. Ideally there is something in between. The problem is that all my professional experiences is in healthcare compliance and operations...as is my masters degree.

I put in my notice because my boss is a micromanager and I have zero passion for what I do anymore. I also feel I’m being discriminated against by things she’s said and done related to my taking days off when my kids have been sick, etc. Today one of my coworkers told me that our work environment is “toxic” and that I’m just the first to leave. I’ve decided to put my family, happiness, and mental health ahead of this job.

I was just looking for some help from anyone who has done a career change. Very much not a joke.

A friend of mine worked in Healthcare as legal Counsel. I always got the impression that she did not like the job. Too litigious and dealing with opposing lawyers (retainers) and insurance companies was taxing.

A couple good friends of mine left the corporate law world to hang up their own shingle. They don't practice criminal law and focus on real estate and tax... they love it!

Sorry for the joke(s), it's tough to change particularly when you have a significant personal investment. Best of luck to you and your family!

Cheers and Go Irish!!
 

Pops Freshenmeyer

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You’re correct. Right now I work in healthcare compliance and I’m looking to transition either into law practice or into financial advising. Ideally there is something in between. The problem is that all my professional experiences is in healthcare compliance and operations...as is my masters degree.

I put in my notice because my boss is a micromanager and I have zero passion for what I do anymore. I also feel I’m being discriminated against by things she’s said and done related to my taking days off when my kids have been sick, etc. Today one of my coworkers told me that our work environment is “toxic” and that I’m just the first to leave. I’ve decided to put my family, happiness, and mental health ahead of this job.

I was just looking for some help from anyone who has done a career change. Very much not a joke.

Law practice is going to be taking out a bunch of loans and spending three years in school just to start over at ground zero in salary and pull 50-60 hour weeks. That is a tough row to hoe if you have a family.

OTOH, there is more room in graduate programs since the ripple effects of 2008 have passed through.
 

Circa

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You’re correct. Right now I work in healthcare compliance and I’m looking to transition either into law practice or into financial advising. Ideally there is something in between. The problem is that all my professional experiences is in healthcare compliance and operations...as is my masters degree.

I put in my notice because my boss is a micromanager and I have zero passion for what I do anymore. I also feel I’m being discriminated against by things she’s said and done related to my taking days off when my kids have been sick, etc. Today one of my coworkers told me that our work environment is “toxic” and that I’m just the first to leave. I’ve decided to put my family, happiness, and mental health ahead of this job.

I was just looking for some help from anyone who has done a career change. Very much not a joke.
I'm pretty sure I'm not alone when I say the American workforce and Its hospitality created by their employers, has been devastated. I know a lot has changed for the worker when right-to-work started.
I can't say I can remember working anywhere In the past 5 years that I haven't felt my mental health being screwed with by manipulation, coercion, falsification, racial divide... Union and Non-Union.
I've taken management classes (Through work) that have taught the art of It In subtle but very eerie ways.
If you find yourself unhappy and have the means, move on.
I'm in the middle of changes myself.
We all still are entitled to the pursuit of happiness, even tho we should work 80 hours a week to support a family, and play baseball in the dark with our kids..
 

ACamp1900

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You’re correct. Right now I work in healthcare compliance and I’m looking to transition either into law practice or into financial advising. Ideally there is something in between. The problem is that all my professional experiences is in healthcare compliance and operations...as is my masters degree.

I put in my notice because my boss is a micromanager and I have zero passion for what I do anymore. I also feel I’m being discriminated against by things she’s said and done related to my taking days off when my kids have been sick, etc. Today one of my coworkers told me that our work environment is “toxic” and that I’m just the first to leave. I’ve decided to put my family, happiness, and mental health ahead of this job.

I was just looking for some help from anyone who has done a career change. Very much not a joke.

Sorry to hear that man,... I learned it’s often not really what you do but who you do it with. How some people get leadership roles boggles me...
 

BGIF

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Law practice is going to be taking out a bunch of loans and spending three years in school just to start over at ground zero in salary and pull 50-60 hour weeks. That is a tough row to hoe if you have a family.

OTOH, there is more room in graduate programs since the ripple effects of 2008 have passed through.


The room in graduate programs noted may increase scholarship opportunities thus reducing additional bills but the interest on any current loans continues to grow while current food, housing, and other familial obligations still have to be met while the transition is being made and until it's covering the nut.
 

ShamrockOnHelmet

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2 years ago I changed industries... that was hard. Didn’t work for like 6 months, then got into consulting for about 9 months. I actually loved consulting (it program and project management), then landed a permenant gig in an entirely different industry. It’s hard when you are going through it, but you have to believe in yourself, or no one else will. The important thing, as others have mentioned, is finding something you like first, then only taking a job there if the leadership team ( your boss) is good. Those are almost the only two things that matter. Pay and titles will come.
 
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Valpodoc85

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You sing the song of modern healthcare. Would seem jobs in healthcare have become increasingly burdensome. I can understand your frustration if your in healthcare compliance. No one wants to hear from compliance as they feel the current rules have become increasingly arbitrary and capricious. the term toxic could be applied to healthcare in general. Unfortunately, I don't think it is a local phenomenon nor will it go away soon. I know people who have changed jobs from healthcare into HR type jobs successsfully. Bon chance in your pursuits
 

Emcee77

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You’re correct. Right now I work in healthcare compliance and I’m looking to transition either into law practice or into financial advising. Ideally there is something in between. The problem is that all my professional experiences is in healthcare compliance and operations...as is my masters degree.

I put in my notice because my boss is a micromanager and I have zero passion for what I do anymore. I also feel I’m being discriminated against by things she’s said and done related to my taking days off when my kids have been sick, etc. Today one of my coworkers told me that our work environment is “toxic” and that I’m just the first to leave. I’ve decided to put my family, happiness, and mental health ahead of this job.

I was just looking for some help from anyone who has done a career change. Very much not a joke.

I know this advice is really boring, but in my experience it really is the key ...

build. and. use. your. network.

Here's my career-change story:

Out of law school, I was delighted to be offered a well-paying job doing insurance coverage litigation and counseling, but after only a matter of months I could see that it wasn't gonna work out for me, for essentially the same reasons you've cited: toxic work environment that wouldn't permit me to spend time with family and lack of passion for the work.

What really sealed it was getting to know the junior partner who (totally micro)managed me. He was about 15 years older than me, had been with this firm his whole career, and at first he seemed like a great guy; in fact, his example was exactly what had induced me to take this job. But I gradually began to see how the job had sapped his soul. He worked late all the time, rarely saw his kids, would get in fights with his wife (a pediatrician) on the phone about when he was coming home that night, and generally seemed pretty unhappy. You've heard that old adage: if you don't want your boss's job, then you aren't in the right place. That was me. (And apparently, it was him too: a couple years after I left, he up and quit the firm to make his own career change! He had no idea what he wanted to do; just didn't want to work there any more. If your BOSS doesn't want your boss's job, then you KNOW you need to get the fuck out of there.)

I had a law-school buddy who was doing a state court trial-level clerkship at the local criminal courthouse. Shitty job for shitty pay, but I was interested in criminal law and constitutional rights, and I could swing it financially because my wife had just gotten her first big-girl job, so I asked my buddy if he thought I could get one of the staff attorney positions there. He said he knew of a spot opening up and he would pass my resume to the presiding judge, who interviewed me, and we hit it off, and I got the job.

After a year, I was beginning to feel like I'd made a mistake because I wasn't sure how I was going to transition to the next thing. But judges around the courthouse were starting to notice that I was a far better legal writer than the average staff attorney there, and when one of the judges I worked with was nominated to the federal district court in our area, he asked me to come clerk for him. After two years, he asked me to stay indefinitely as his career clerk. I now have pretty much the perfect legal job for me right now, given my personal interests (I was always kind of a law and legal writing nerd) and my family situation, which requires me to make a decent six-figure salary but, because of my wife's demanding career and small children, makes regular travel or after-hours work kind of out of the question (although I have to do it occasionally ... I am in the office right now ... that's just modern legal life).

So BOTTOM LINE: work your connections, follow your interests, work hard to impress people, and you'll end up finding yourself in the right place at the right time. And don't be afraid to take a leap of faith! I know that's easier said than done when you have a family to think about, but if dad's not happy, the family won't be happy. Be responsible, but also believe in yourself and in your ability to turn a risk into an opportunity to take a step toward prosperity.

Tangential note: I haven't been on the site that much the past couple years (except for the soccer thread from time to time) due to the craziness that comes with being in a two-career household with a bunch of small children at home, but I'm delighted to see that things haven't changed on IE and I still get some of the inside jokes. Love and miss you guys. Wish lawyering with small kids at home didn't take up like ALL of my TIME these days.
 

ACamp1900

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I wonder if I can piggyback off of this for a moment...?

I'm finalizing a cross country move. I have interviewed for half a dozen jobs in the new area. I now have two soft offers on the table for jobs that would get me where I need to go but are whatever pay wise and don't sound too fulfilling... then there's this other job.

Pretty close to a dream job: I interviewed on the 17th (I knew I nailed it and my experiences and such were a perfect fit), was told at the ned of the interview they would move very fast from there, my references were then checked on the 21st. The University in question then shut down from the 21st to the 2nd. I assumed all Christmas break I would get an offer from this potential employer soon after the break but have yet to hear anything, and,.... I'm becoming a nervous wreak.

So, hiring managers (if any)... do you bother to check references for someone you have no real intent on offering? I hear one of two things typically: decision is made and the references are being checked to confirm the decision (this is by far the most common I have come across in Higher Ed. and I myself have never checked a reference for someone I didn't ultimately offer) or they check a handful and go from there... any perspective would be great as my mind is really starting to jack with me now.
 
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Irish#1

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I wonder if I can piggyback off of this for a moment...?

I'm finalizing a cross country move. I have interviewed for half a dozen jobs in the new area. I now have two soft offers on the table for jobs that would get me where I need to go but are whatever pay wise and don't sound too fulfilling... then there's this other job.

Pretty close to a dream job: I interviewed on the 17th (I knew I nailed it and my experiences and such were a perfect fit), was told at the ned of the interview they would move very fast from there, my references were then checked on the 21st. The University in question then shut down from the 21st to the 2nd. I assumed all Christmas break I would get an offer from this potential employer soon after the break but have yet to hear anything, and,.... I'm becoming a nervous wreak.

So, hiring managers (if any)... do you bother to check references for someone you have no real intent on offering? I hear one of two things typically: decision is made and the references are being checked to confirm the decision (this is by far the most common I have come across in Higher Ed. and I myself have never checked a reference for someone I didn't ultimately offer) or they check a handful and go from there... any perspective would be great as my mind is really starting to jack with me now.

The only time I check references is when I'm ready to make an offer, or it's down to a couple candidates who are very equal and I use the references as the tie breaker.

However, it is not untypical for a timeline to get pushed back, especially after a holiday season. This may need to get final approval from further up the line and as much as we'd like for everyone to be available to answer our email or phone call right away, it may take a little longer.

I did IT recruiting for about a year back in '91. Nothing ever goes as planned. It's human nature.
 
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NDohio

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I wonder if I can piggyback off of this for a moment...?

I'm finalizing a cross country move. I have interviewed for half a dozen jobs in the new area. I now have two soft offers on the table for jobs that would get me where I need to go but are whatever pay wise and don't sound too fulfilling... then there's this other job.

Pretty close to a dream job: I interviewed on the 17th (I knew I nailed it and my experiences and such were a perfect fit), was told at the ned of the interview they would move very fast from there, my references were then checked on the 21st. The University in question then shut down from the 21st to the 2nd. I assumed all Christmas break I would get an offer from this potential employer soon after the break but have yet to hear anything, and,.... I'm becoming a nervous wreak.

So, hiring managers (if any)... do you bother to check references for someone you have no real intent on offering? I hear one of two things typically: decision is made and the references are being checked to confirm the decision (this is by far the most common I have come across in Higher Ed. and I myself have never checked a reference for someone I didn't ultimately offer) or they check a handful and go from there... any perspective would be great as my mind is really starting to jack with me now.


I have been on both sides of this waiting game recently. I was trying to hire someone to be a salesperson while I, their would be boss, was working on getting hired elsewhere. Both hiring timelines took/have taken forever(mine is over, the other guy is still ongoing). But, as the person doing the hiring, I have never asked for references for someone that I didn't intend to hire. I really wouldn't take the time to make those inquiries unless it was for someone that was going to become part of the organization.

I am sure your mind is going crazy with all the what ifs...I was that way for the last eight weeks while I was in the midst of all this. I was talking to three different companies and I received two offers on the same day. You will get there.
 

ACamp1900

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The only time I check references is when I'm ready to make an offer, or it's down to a couple candidates who are very equal and I use the references as the tie breaker.

However, it is not untypical for a timeline to get pushed back, especially after a holiday season. This may need to get final approval from further up the line and as much as we'd like for everyone to be available to answer our email or phone call right away, it may take a little longer.

I really hope this is the case... it's down to a job that I would love doing, working with a team I already have a great vibe for/with, and money that is borderline life changing,.. vs. just a job that will get me out there that happens to be a backwards step career wise, while working with people I can already tell may be pretty difficult. I'm trying to not think about it and just be patient but it's getting harder by the day.
 

Whiskeyjack

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I really hope this is the case... it's down to a job that I would love doing, working with a team I already have a great vibe for/with, and money that is borderline life changing,.. vs. just a job that will get me out there that happens to be a backwards step career wise, while working with people I can already tell may be pretty difficult. I'm trying to not think about it and just be patient but it's getting harder by the day.

Pick up that rosary someone gifted you and pray for the intervention of St. Joseph the Worker.
 

Pops Freshenmeyer

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I really hope this is the case... it's down to a job that I would love doing, working with a team I already have a great vibe for/with, and money that is borderline life changing,.. vs. just a job that will get me out there that happens to be a backwards step career wise, while working with people I can already tell may be pretty difficult. I'm trying to not think about it and just be patient but it's getting harder by the day.

Good luck, man, but now you're going to be reduced to eating Chipotle like the rest of us.
 

drayer54

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Broseph I left the Nuke industry and went into Oil and Gas.

I couldn’t be happier. Initially, it was a pay cut.

Now it’s far and beyond what I was making.

Go for something and be passionate. You’ll promote into pay.

Lastly, job satisfaction means so much to a man. Find it.

I am also looking for a career change. I'm currently in the nuke industry and trying to find something. I've been looking at oil and gas and other portions of energy.

I think we hit this years ago, but I'd be curious to hear about your transition.

The pay cut scares me, but it is inevitable.

I'd have to stay in energy because nobody is wasting bandwidth or dollars to watch me bang anything.
 

Irish#1

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I really hope this is the case... it's down to a job that I would love doing, working with a team I already have a great vibe for/with, and money that is borderline life changing,.. vs. just a job that will get me out there that happens to be a backwards step career wise, while working with people I can already tell may be pretty difficult. I'm trying to not think about it and just be patient but it's getting harder by the day.

Another personal example that hopefully helps. I was interviewing at two companies. Both looked extremely promising. I really prefered one company at the time. There were looking to hire me in HR to do IT recruiting because of my IT background and having been a recruiter for a year. Things were going great and then seemed to dry up as I hadn't heard from them in a long time. Turns out they also gave my resume to IT to look at and IT wanted to hire me, so I had two departments interested in me.

Just another example of the weird and crazy things that can happen when it comes to hiring.
 

RDU Irish

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You’re correct. Right now I work in healthcare compliance and I’m looking to transition either into law practice or into financial advising. Ideally there is something in between. The problem is that all my professional experiences is in healthcare compliance and operations...as is my masters degree.

I put in my notice because my boss is a micromanager and I have zero passion for what I do anymore. I also feel I’m being discriminated against by things she’s said and done related to my taking days off when my kids have been sick, etc. Today one of my coworkers told me that our work environment is “toxic” and that I’m just the first to leave. I’ve decided to put my family, happiness, and mental health ahead of this job.

I was just looking for some help from anyone who has done a career change. Very much not a joke.

Sounds like you hate your environment more than the work. Do you have ability to parlay your experience in to practice - knowing how to spot compliance deficiencies should have value. Bird dog some nice malpractice money and you will be smoking stogies in no time. Good luck chasing those ambulances and embodying every lawyer stereotype on the planet.

Really hate myself for not jumping on the obvious "just PIIHB" solution to your boss.
 

Rack Em

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Sounds like you hate your environment more than the work. Do you have ability to parlay your experience in to practice - knowing how to spot compliance deficiencies should have value. Bird dog some nice malpractice money and you will be smoking stogies in no time. Good luck chasing those ambulances and embodying every lawyer stereotype on the planet.

Really hate myself for not jumping on the obvious "just PIIHB" solution to your boss.

Work environment is 0/10 for sure, but it's hard to gauge how much I dislike the work because the environment has a direct impact on that. So yes, I'd say you're right.

I've already passed the Bar in a different state so I'm going to take the Bar here in July. That will help open doors. Honestly, the Medical Malpractice area is something I never wanted to consider because it seemed so sleazy. But a few years in the working world has made me realize that people are sleazy, not so much the profession. I'm going to look into that...and the stogies would be a nice bonus.

PIIHB could have been a solid solution once upon a time...
 

Whiskeyjack

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You mean the necklace he wears in casual situations?

11633797-60028.jpg
 

Legacy

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I wonder if I can piggyback off of this for a moment...?

I'm finalizing a cross country move. I have interviewed for half a dozen jobs in the new area. I now have two soft offers on the table for jobs that would get me where I need to go but are whatever pay wise and don't sound too fulfilling... then there's this other job.

Pretty close to a dream job: I interviewed on the 17th (I knew I nailed it and my experiences and such were a perfect fit), was told at the ned of the interview they would move very fast from there, my references were then checked on the 21st. The University in question then shut down from the 21st to the 2nd. I assumed all Christmas break I would get an offer from this potential employer soon after the break but have yet to hear anything, and,.... I'm becoming a nervous wreak.

So, hiring managers (if any)... do you bother to check references for someone you have no real intent on offering? I hear one of two things typically: decision is made and the references are being checked to confirm the decision (this is by far the most common I have come across in Higher Ed. and I myself have never checked a reference for someone I didn't ultimately offer) or they check a handful and go from there... any perspective would be great as my mind is really starting to jack with me now.

Assuming you have passed a criminal background check, drug screening, social media usage and evidence a passing interest in the local NFL team... "How 'bout them 'Boys?" works in Texas, for instance.
 

Irish#1

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Assuming you have passed a criminal background check, drug screening, social media usage and evidence a passing interest in the local NFL team... "How 'bout them 'Boys?" works in Texas, for instance.

I think you just nailed it on the head.

In all seriousness, AC, I assume you sent the recommended follow up "Thank you"?
 

Irish#1

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I have an open position I'm filling. I posted the job on Indeed. While I'm getting my share of resumes from those that don't qualify (I don't blame them for trying) what surprised me the most is how little time people stay in their job. Even those that meet the qualifications have only stayed in a job for a year before moving on. I would venture to say 90% of the resumes are like this.

By looking at the education dates and previous jobs, almost everyone that has responded is a millennial. What the hell is wrong with these kids?
 

zelezo vlk

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I have an open position I'm filling. I posted the job on Indeed. While I'm getting my share of resumes from those that don't qualify (I don't blame them for trying) what surprised me the most is how little time people stay in their job. Even those that meet the qualifications have only stayed in a job for a year before moving on. I would venture to say 90% of the resumes are like this.

By looking at the education dates and previous jobs, almost everyone that has responded is a millennial. What the hell is wrong with these kids?

Speaking from my experience, companies don't do much to retain employees anymore. Ever since I was in high school, my parents were telling me that the days of people being a "lifer" are pretty much done. If your company does a good job of paying their employees well, you'll probably do decently. But many don't, for instance my company. It's basically "if you want to get paid more, you better leave or find a new job in the company, otherwise you'll be paid this much forever." The only way many young'ns find to actually improve their pay is to move from company to company.

So nothing is at all wrong with these kids.
 

Wild Bill

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Speaking from my experience, companies don't do much to retain employees anymore. Ever since I was in high school, my parents were telling me that the days of people being a "lifer" are pretty much done. If your company does a good job of paying their employees well, you'll probably do decently. But many don't, for instance my company. It's basically "if you want to get paid more, you better leave or find a new job in the company, otherwise you'll be paid this much forever." The only way many young'ns find to actually improve their pay is to move from company to company.

So nothing is at all wrong with these kids.

Most companies aren't loyal to their employees so they don't deserve, nor should they expect, loyalty in return.

The other issue is that millennials, at least a large number of them in urban areas, do not have mortgages or car payments so they are far more mobile than previous generations.
 

Pops Freshenmeyer

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Some of that can be explained by their youth and inexperience, but millennials have other problems. Many graduated into a recession, which research has shown is likely to be a lifetime drain on their average earnings. Despite being the largest generation in the U.S. workforce, they make on average 20% less than boomers did at the same age.

http://fortune.com/2017/03/29/millennials-income-chart/
 
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