Career Change Advice

Irish#1

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Speaking from my experience, companies don't do much to retain employees anymore. Ever since I was in high school, my parents were telling me that the days of people being a "lifer" are pretty much done. If your company does a good job of paying their employees well, you'll probably do decently. But many don't, for instance my company. It's basically "if you want to get paid more, you better leave or find a new job in the company, otherwise you'll be paid this much forever." The only way many young'ns find to actually improve their pay is to move from company to company.

So nothing is at all wrong with these kids.


Most companies aren't loyal to their employees so they don't deserve, nor should they expect, loyalty in return.

The other issue is that millennials, at least a large number of them in urban areas, do not have mortgages or car payments so they are far more mobile than previous generations.


Trust me, I understand there is no loyalty either way. Everyone has to lookout for themselves. Nothing wrong with these kids? I don't buy it totally. Not sure how old your parents are, but people haven't been lifers for a long long time. They've moved from company to company to get a better salary for as long as I can remember, but they weren't leaving after just a year which is my point. If you keep moving every year the amount of salary you gain isn't going to be that great and at some point the hiring manager won't want to hire you knowing they will have to go through the hiring process again in just a year. At least give it 2-3 years to let something develop.
 

zelezo vlk

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Just to give my personal experience, it took some time to find a job after graduation. In my interview with my first company, I was told that it was dead-end and that the pay increase would only be marginal, if at all. I was desperate so I took the opportunity and stayed for a year. At my current job, I've been here for over 2 years, and was expecting a merit increase, because I'd heard this company likes to reward their employees. Well that changed, and my increase was for less than inflation, in addition to me being given 2.5 to 3 times more work for the rest of the year. It was also fairly plainly stated that if I wanted to make more money, I'd need to move and switch to a different part of the company, requiring me to learn new skills. Meaning that I effectively would be needing a new job. Not everybody has a job like this, but I'm far from the only guy with this kinda personal experience.

Does your company do a good job of retaining employees? I know that you've mentioned your troublesome employee many times in the Rant Thread, but how about everybody else? Do people tend to stay for a long time? On my first day at my current place, the median number of years people had been working here was 10 or more. But my company has cheaped out and has been slowly losing more and more of their veterans. Millennials DO watch this stuff, we're not all dog-crazed wandering travel junkies.
 

Ndaccountant

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I have an open position I'm filling. I posted the job on Indeed. While I'm getting my share of resumes from those that don't qualify (I don't blame them for trying) what surprised me the most is how little time people stay in their job. Even those that meet the qualifications have only stayed in a job for a year before moving on. I would venture to say 90% of the resumes are like this.

By looking at the education dates and previous jobs, almost everyone that has responded is a millennial. What the hell is wrong with these kids?

FT_17.04.17_millennialJobTenure_change.png


This isn't a millennial thing. Pew compared back to Gen X and millennials, especially college educated, are sticking around more.

I also think an understanding of the job-hopping is essential. I think the chart below is really important. You can view this as an employee or as the employer. I think we know there are many, many, employers who treat their employment base like the left side of the table. Employees are often searching for the right.

image-1504795727137-caaee9b5943bffa7f154664764f9e84e.jpg
 

Ndaccountant

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Just to give my personal experience, it took some time to find a job after graduation. In my interview with my first company, I was told that it was dead-end and that the pay increase would only be marginal, if at all. I was desperate so I took the opportunity and stayed for a year. At my current job, I've been here for over 2 years, and was expecting a merit increase, because I'd heard this company likes to reward their employees. Well that changed, and my increase was for less than inflation, in addition to me being given 2.5 to 3 times more work for the rest of the year. It was also fairly plainly stated that if I wanted to make more money, I'd need to move and switch to a different part of the company, requiring me to learn new skills. Meaning that I effectively would be needing a new job. Not everybody has a job like this, but I'm far from the only guy with this kinda personal experience.

Does your company do a good job of retaining employees? I know that you've mentioned your troublesome employee many times in the Rant Thread, but how about everybody else? Do people tend to stay for a long time? On my first day at my current place, the median number of years people had been working here was 10 or more. But my company has cheaped out and has been slowly losing more and more of their veterans. Millennials DO watch this stuff, we're not all dog-crazed wandering travel junkies.

That sucks.

I will say that I know I am lucky having been able to be working for a very good company where bonus and merit compares very favorably. I have been with the company since I graduated in 2009 and my total comp is up over 300% and there is still significant runway to increase without selling out work life balance.
 

zelezo vlk

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That sucks.

I will say that I know I am lucky having been able to be working for a very good company where bonus and merit compares very favorably. I have been with the company since I graduated in 2009 and my total comp is up over 300% and there is still significant runway to increase without selling out work life balance.

Man, I'm very happy for you. I hope you can be a lifer!
 

dublinirish

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18 months is the most i stick at a job generally and have done this since i graduated back in 2006.
 

Veritate Duce Progredi

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I entered the workforce in 2009 with an hourly rate - job. Managed to turn that into a salaried position. Stayed there almost two full years before jumping to a similar position with another system for a 40% pay increase. Stayed there almost two years and jumped to consulting for stupid money but stupid travel. Found a consulting position with minimal travel that ultimately turned into my current position which has me sitting at ~ 200% of my original salary.

Now looking to shift positions within the same company and I'm running myself into the ground preparing for the technical interview.

My current company values their employees but expects high performance. They look for high performers to make part of their ongoing operations.

Just a message to the discouraged or under-appreciated among us: there are good employers out there. Try to always be professional, even when heading for the exit and continually work to develop yourself.
 

RDU Irish

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Work environment is 0/10 for sure, but it's hard to gauge how much I dislike the work because the environment has a direct impact on that. So yes, I'd say you're right.

I've already passed the Bar in a different state so I'm going to take the Bar here in July. That will help open doors. Honestly, the Medical Malpractice area is something I never wanted to consider because it seemed so sleazy. But a few years in the working world has made me realize that people are sleazy, not so much the profession. I'm going to look into that...and the stogies would be a nice bonus.

PIIHB could have been a solid solution once upon a time...

Having heard plenty of stories from my wife - IMO the only way most systems are going to change is if they get sued into submission. So many patients have no idea how bad some practitioners are that they are subjected to. So many assume blindly that their medical providers are some altruistic saints looking out for their best interest when reality is often someone punching the clock and cutting corners to GTFO on time.
 

ACamp1900

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ACamp, you get that job?

Nope, still haven’t heard. I got yet another job offer that basically keeps my career on track with where it was,... declined the others. I start on the 4th. I’m happy enough, but not the dream I almost got.
 
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Valpodoc85

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Having heard plenty of stories from my wife - IMO the only way most systems are going to change is if they get sued into submission. So many patients have no idea how bad some practitioners are that they are subjected to. So many assume blindly that their medical providers are some altruistic saints looking out for their best interest when reality is often someone punching the clock and cutting corners to GTFO on time.

Not sure I agree with your wife. I will say medicine is in a bad place. The primary care doctors have been eviscerated over the past decade. Partially from increasing overhead and partially from government expectations that make the job harder. The average family doctor has about 8 to 10 minutes to hear your problems, ask appropriate questions, physically assess you and document all that on the computer. Fail to ask someone if they have a functional smoke detector or if they want smoking cessation advice you fail to meet "meaningful use criteria..." The Man can then pay you less for all your work. Most primary care doctors are now owned by the health care systems who have compliance officers that check your work. Needless to say frustration is much more the rule than the exception. Specialists are then flooded with problems that should be handled by primary care and they become frustrated. All this has not contributed to a higher standard of care. (much like standardized testing in schools does lead to higher outcomes).

Don't get me wrong, the doctors are still responsible for the care they deliver.
 

RDU Irish

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Not sure I agree with your wife. I will say medicine is in a bad place. The primary care doctors have been eviscerated over the past decade. Partially from increasing overhead and partially from government expectations that make the job harder. The average family doctor has about 8 to 10 minutes to hear your problems, ask appropriate questions, physically assess you and document all that on the computer. Fail to ask someone if they have a functional smoke detector or if they want smoking cessation advice you fail to meet "meaningful use criteria..." The Man can then pay you less for all your work. Most primary care doctors are now owned by the health care systems who have compliance officers that check your work. Needless to say frustration is much more the rule than the exception. Specialists are then flooded with problems that should be handled by primary care and they become frustrated. All this has not contributed to a higher standard of care. (much like standardized testing in schools does lead to higher outcomes).

Don't get me wrong, the doctors are still responsible for the care they deliver.

Familiar with the term "LGFD"? Amazing how many can skirt the system and check the boxes better/faster than actual hands on providers and be rewarded for it. Give an 8 hour person 50 newborn to assess and then not pay them for their full 14-16 hours of work (yes, technically hourly, not salaried). And admin doesn't wonder why most the staff cuts corners to get out on time - they badger the ones who can't keep up.

That is administrative negligence, IMO. No way to defend the hospital that puts that demand on its staff regularly. Not to mention bad business - those assessments catch all kinds of things that can/should be done before leaving or at least more likely to be referred within your four walls. Attitude that pediatricians will take care of it later is pretty crappy. If any doctor withheld information on my kids b/c they were lazy and someone else would catch it later I would call that immoral if not malpractice.

To my original point - understanding the intricacies of scheduling, processes, billing and the reality of how a system works could lead an attorney to asking for very telling information that would make The Man even more uncomfortable in a lawsuit.
 

Valpodoc85

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I agree with your point. Problem is bad management and incompetent billing seems to be the rule. Hard to win that lawsuit when its instutionalized. Most med mall guys are going for the low hanging fruit.
 

Irish#1

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Just to give my personal experience, it took some time to find a job after graduation. In my interview with my first company, I was told that it was dead-end and that the pay increase would only be marginal, if at all. I was desperate so I took the opportunity and stayed for a year. At my current job, I've been here for over 2 years, and was expecting a merit increase, because I'd heard this company likes to reward their employees. Well that changed, and my increase was for less than inflation, in addition to me being given 2.5 to 3 times more work for the rest of the year. It was also fairly plainly stated that if I wanted to make more money, I'd need to move and switch to a different part of the company, requiring me to learn new skills. Meaning that I effectively would be needing a new job. Not everybody has a job like this, but I'm far from the only guy with this kinda personal experience.

Does your company do a good job of retaining employees? I know that you've mentioned your troublesome employee many times in the Rant Thread, but how about everybody else? Do people tend to stay for a long time? On my first day at my current place, the median number of years people had been working here was 10 or more. But my company has cheaped out and has been slowly losing more and more of their veterans. Millennials DO watch this stuff, we're not all dog-crazed wandering travel junkies.

Sorry for the late response. Employee loyalty has been great here. I've been here 5 1/2 years and I'm something of a newbie comparatively. At our annual Xmas luncheon we recognize employees anniversaries that hit their 5, 10, 15, 20+ years of service for that year. This year we recognized 12 employees who have been with the company 5 years or longer. We have about 120 employees total. I would guess about 60-70% have been with the company five years or longer. Our company is facing something of a minor crisis as we are seeing a lot of employees retire or will be retiring in the next year or two and will need to fill these positions with younger workers. Because of our industry "Industrial Distribution" we don't have that many people with degrees. We have lots of warehouse workers and CSR's. Positions that don't require a degree.

Our owner is great. Back when the housing market and economy took a dump he was forced to let some people go for the first time in the companies history. Everyone else had to take a pay cut. When the economy bounced back, he repaid everyone the salary they would have earned before a pay cut. As long as the company is profitable, we receive annual bonuses. I really can't speak for salaries in other departments, but my department (IT) earns a decent living. Our health insurance sucks though. It's quite expensive.

I've worked in large corporations most of my career until the last 10 years. There's not a lot you can do about raises and advancement at large corporations because of the layers of bureaucracy everyone likes to hide behind. While working at a smaller company has some disadvantages I've found a gem here. Our owner believes in technology and has stated more than once that IT will lead the way. Most smaller companies look at IT as nothing more than an expense. He understands that technology can introduce systems to increase sales and the bottom line.

I don't lump all millenials together, but the underlying theme seems to be consistent from what I've seen. I have an open position I'm going to fill. I received a lot of resumes and the vast majority of them were moving from job to job every year. Some of that is probably the employer and some the employee. I would agree that those with degrees probably stay longer. Probably because they don't look strictly at the paycheck, but consider things like benefits, job satisfaction, commute to work, flexible hours, etc.

I did rant about that employee I had. He was a pain in the butt and had worn out his welcome. The rest of my staff avoided him like the plague. I should have fired him the day he walked out of a meeting, but I considered his family. When we decided to have a small marketing department the VP decided he would create two positions, Marketing Mgr and a graphics position. They decided to let the pain in the butt employee have the graphics position. I warned them that this was a mistake. Since he's moved to that position, I've been told more than once by the Marketing Mgr how he wished he had never considered him. lol

My advice......In general, unless you could land a job with a considerable increase in pay and as long as your job's not toxic and you don't fret over the job day & night I would stay for a couple of years to see how thing work out.
 

Irish#1

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I entered the workforce in 2009 with an hourly rate - job. Managed to turn that into a salaried position. Stayed there almost two full years before jumping to a similar position with another system for a 40% pay increase. Stayed there almost two years and jumped to consulting for stupid money but stupid travel. Found a consulting position with minimal travel that ultimately turned into my current position which has me sitting at ~ 200% of my original salary.

Now looking to shift positions within the same company and I'm running myself into the ground preparing for the technical interview.

My current company values their employees but expects high performance. They look for high performers to make part of their ongoing operations.

Just a message to the discouraged or under-appreciated among us: there are good employers out there. Try to always be professional, even when heading for the exit and continually work to develop yourself.

I knew a couple of people who had done that and after about a year they were burnt out. My son in law had been with his company for close to 20 years and was pretty happy. He took a consultant gig with a crazy increase in pay and crazy travel. I told my SIL to give it careful consideration before accepting. After a year, he was asking me if I had any openings.

Nope, still haven’t heard. I got yet another job offer that basically keeps my career on track with where it was,... declined the others. I start on the 4th. I’m happy enough, but not the dream I almost got.

Now that you have a job in hand, call the other one back and ask for an update. Don't be afraid that it will hurt your chances, it won't.
 

ACamp1900

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ACamp, you get that job?

They just offered it to me... took their sweet time didn't they??? Super excited but now I have to tell the school that just hired me I have to resign... oh well.
 

Veritate Duce Progredi

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Having heard plenty of stories from my wife - IMO the only way most systems are going to change is if they get sued into submission. So many patients have no idea how bad some practitioners are that they are subjected to. So many assume blindly that their medical providers are some altruistic saints looking out for their best interest when reality is often someone punching the clock and cutting corners to GTFO on time.

Many may not be saints but everyone of them sacrificed a large chunk of their early years to be health care workers (if we're speaking about physicians). I think there are a large number of issues with healthcare (and many good things) but intentionally negligent providers is not among the biggest issues, nor is it likely to affect you or anyone you know.

Government, insurance companies, tort reform, pharmaceuticals, research - all of this should be addressed before we worry about rogue providers. Providers can be burned out, they can have excessive demands put on them by higher powers but I honestly can't say I've come across one that was knowingly negligent or cutting corners.

I'm sure they are out there but again, that's the least of my concerns having worked in/around healthcare for over a decade (and with many friends at various levels in the community).
 

zelezo vlk

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They just offered it to me... took their sweet time didn't they??? Super excited but now I have to tell the school that just hired me I have to resign... oh well.

How long have you been there? I have no idea how I'd even approach that conversation
 

ab2cmiller

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How long have you been there? I have no idea how I'd even approach that conversation

Obviously they will not be happy.

He just needs to explain that he had not been pursuing any other options after he accepted the position and he had assumed this "new opportunity" had already been filled by someone else since he interviewed more than 2 months ago. They will certainly be a bit more understanding then those people who accept positions just to grab a paycheck while they keep looking for a better opportunity. Again , they won't be happy, but I don't think they will have judged you to be a scumbag.
 

Irish#1

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They just offered it to me... took their sweet time didn't they??? Super excited but now I have to tell the school that just hired me I have to resign... oh well.

Congrats........you never know how these things will play out.
 

Irish#1

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Obviously they will not be happy.

He just needs to explain that he had not been pursuing any other options after he accepted the position and he had assumed this "new opportunity" had already been filled by someone else since he interviewed more than 2 months ago. They will certainly be a bit more understanding then those people who accept positions just to grab a paycheck while they keep looking for a better opportunity. Again , they won't be happy, but I don't think they will have judged you to be a scumbag.

Agee, just be straight forward and honest.
 

ACamp1900

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How long have you been there? I have no idea how I'd even approach that conversation

3 weeks. They can be upset but just like what was shared previously,... I’ll be honest and all I can do. It’s a huge leap career wise so they’ll understand I’m sure, if not, oh well. In a perfect world the dream job hires me a month ago tho for sure.
 
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BleedBlueGold

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I've been contemplating a career change myself. Only my new "career" would be spending more time at home with my 3 yr old and newborn. Currently trying to find a way to make it work financially if I work 4 days per week. It's tricky.

I remember making this post. It came during a time in which I was recovering from a spinal fusion surgery and got to be at home with my kids quite a bit. It's been three and a half years since then and the only move I've made towards this goal is getting my real estate license. I still work in healthcare and it's only gotten worse. I'm miserable here. But I also haven't had much luck with real estate. Mostly because it's hard to work two full-time jobs and still be a decent father/husband, which I prioritize above all else. I want to quit healthcare, but I'm terrified to leave a 15-year salaried position for the unknown of a full-commission sales job that is potentially on the verge of a crash.

You’re correct. Right now I work in healthcare compliance and I’m looking to transition either into law practice or into financial advising. Ideally there is something in between. The problem is that all my professional experiences is in healthcare compliance and operations...as is my masters degree.

I put in my notice because my boss is a micromanager and I have zero passion for what I do anymore. I also feel I’m being discriminated against by things she’s said and done related to my taking days off when my kids have been sick, etc. Today one of my coworkers told me that our work environment is “toxic” and that I’m just the first to leave. I’ve decided to put my family, happiness, and mental health ahead of this job.

I was just looking for some help from anyone who has done a career change. Very much not a joke.

I envy your courage. How have things panned out since your decision to change careers? Would you have done anything different?

My best friend also worked in healthcare for 15 years and he finally just quit to become a real estate appraiser. His situation is different though in that 1) his wife makes a lot of money 2) their personal financial situation is crazy good, ie. no debt, house paid off, over $100k in savings, family money coming down the line at some point and 3) his dad is a very successful appraiser with a client base that is already established. My friend just stepped right in and can continue the success of his dad where the financial floor is already higher than what he left in healthcare. It was a no-brainer.

I could only dream of the luxury my friend had. But in my case, it's a start from scratch, build your own base situation. Even in this hot real estate market, that's not exactly easy or guaranteed. The hours required to start from the ground up and still be successful will take me away from my wife and kids, which defeats the purpose of leaving healthcare in the first place. I'd be fine with a pay cut, but not a crippling one.
 

Rack Em

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I remember making this post. It came during a time in which I was recovering from a spinal fusion surgery and got to be at home with my kids quite a bit. It's been three and a half years since then and the only move I've made towards this goal is getting my real estate license. I still work in healthcare and it's only gotten worse. I'm miserable here. But I also haven't had much luck with real estate. Mostly because it's hard to work two full-time jobs and still be a decent father/husband, which I prioritize above all else. I want to quit healthcare, but I'm terrified to leave a 15-year salaried position for the unknown of a full-commission sales job that is potentially on the verge of a crash.



I envy your courage. How have things panned out since your decision to change careers? Would you have done anything different?

My best friend also worked in healthcare for 15 years and he finally just quit to become a real estate appraiser. His situation is different though in that 1) his wife makes a lot of money 2) their personal financial situation is crazy good, ie. no debt, house paid off, over $100k in savings, family money coming down the line at some point and 3) his dad is a very successful appraiser with a client base that is already established. My friend just stepped right in and can continue the success of his dad where the financial floor is already higher than what he left in healthcare. It was a no-brainer.

I could only dream of the luxury my friend had. But in my case, it's a start from scratch, build your own base situation. Even in this hot real estate market, that's not exactly easy or guaranteed. The hours required to start from the ground up and still be successful will take me away from my wife and kids, which defeats the purpose of leaving healthcare in the first place. I'd be fine with a pay cut, but not a crippling one.

There were difficult moments, but honestly, I couldn't have scripted it any better. I left that job and ended up in another dead-end job that I quit after 5 months. I was doing some contract work on the side and kept pushing my boss at that job to give me a bigger role and bring me in full time. That didn't happen, but I was fortunate enough that he gave me opportunities to build a compliance program on my own in an 80+ doctor practice. That's extremely uncommon in physician practices, but I took advantage of that and parlayed those experiences into a job with an addiction start up company that was rapidly expanding. Got to cut my teeth again, but on a much larger scale. Then, out of the blue, I got a LinkedIn message from a guy who helped start the largest Radiology practice in the US and was looking to replicate that success but in Orthopedics. He was looking for a lawyer to start the legal team and got a recommendation from a friend of mine from grad school. I'm in a job I'm absolutely underqualified for by 10-15 years, but I love every minute of it. It's allowed my wife to stay home with our kids without us having to make many sacrifices

My best advice going through all of this:
1) Believe in yourself, but make sure your spouse does as well. Sometimes they can push us in ways we need to be pushed
2) Lean on your network
3) Treat every professional opportunity as a way to learn more and to do more than what is required
4) If you're struggling with what to do, think "What will my kids see in me if I go down this road?" You can be a ditch digger or a CEO, but you should choose the path that makes you a happier and better person for your kids.
5) Pray about it. A lot.
 

Rack Em

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With your compliance background JCAHO maybe for you....

AbleMelodicHapuka-size_restricted.gif


I told my boss that I would take this job, but that I wanted to get out of compliance and work in-house on the private-equity transaction side. JCAHO is wayyyyyyyy too bureaucratic. It would kill my soul to work there.
 

BleedBlueGold

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There were difficult moments, but honestly, I couldn't have scripted it any better. I left that job and ended up in another dead-end job that I quit after 5 months. I was doing some contract work on the side and kept pushing my boss at that job to give me a bigger role and bring me in full time. That didn't happen, but I was fortunate enough that he gave me opportunities to build a compliance program on my own in an 80+ doctor practice. That's extremely uncommon in physician practices, but I took advantage of that and parlayed those experiences into a job with an addiction start up company that was rapidly expanding. Got to cut my teeth again, but on a much larger scale. Then, out of the blue, I got a LinkedIn message from a guy who helped start the largest Radiology practice in the US and was looking to replicate that success but in Orthopedics. He was looking for a lawyer to start the legal team and got a recommendation from a friend of mine from grad school. I'm in a job I'm absolutely underqualified for by 10-15 years, but I love every minute of it. It's allowed my wife to stay home with our kids without us having to make many sacrifices

My best advice going through all of this:
1) Believe in yourself, but make sure your spouse does as well. Sometimes they can push us in ways we need to be pushed
2) Lean on your network
3) Treat every professional opportunity as a way to learn more and to do more than what is required
4) If you're struggling with what to do, think "What will my kids see in me if I go down this road?" You can be a ditch digger or a CEO, but you should choose the path that makes you a happier and better person for your kids.
5) Pray about it. A lot.

Being a stay at home dad would make me and my kids happier, but that's not financially achievable. Lol

Thanks for the insight. I've prayed, analyzed, re-analyzed, prayed some more.....just hoping an opportunity arises at some point before my kids are grown. They're 7 and 3 right now and my 3-year old already makes comments about me working all the time and notices me not being home. It kills me. I need to make a change.
 

Whiskeyjack

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My best advice going through all of this:
1) Believe in yourself, but make sure your spouse does as well. Sometimes they can push us in ways we need to be pushed
2) Lean on your network
3) Treat every professional opportunity as a way to learn more and to do more than what is required
4) If you're struggling with what to do, think "What will my kids see in me if I go down this road?" You can be a ditch digger or a CEO, but you should choose the path that makes you a happier and better person for your kids.
5) Pray about it. A lot.
Adding onto Rack Em's excellent advice above, if you're looking to switch tracks with your career, this is the time to do it before the labor market softens any further. Snell & Willmer, one of the biggest firms in Phoenix, is paying their first year associates $180k to start, and that has a knock-on effect for everyone else downstream.

There are way more open jobs than candidates qualified to fill them, so employers and recruiters are throwing stupid money at anyone with a pulse right now. For example, I hired my first associate attorney last year. He was a friend of mine who had been working for the AG's office on child dependency cases, and taking kids away from meth head parents every day had worn him down over a couple years. He wasn't a good employee for me, and I'd had a couple uncomfortable conversations with him about how he'd need to improve if he wanted to remain in private practice. But then a bigger firm in Tempe offered to double his salary, so he left with two-weeks notice (he didn't even last two months at the bigger firm, but that's another story). It probably saved our friendship, since I likely would have had to fire him had he not left on his own. But he wasn't worth what I was paying him, let alone double that.

So I've despaired of hiring a young associate (at least a Millennial attorney), and am all-in on expanding via paralegals or older solo practitioners that are tired of trying to wear all the hats that requires. The "traditional" paths of hiring newbies fresh out of school, or requiring X years of experience in a specific field, haven't been working for a lot of organizations, so they're focusing more on getting the right person first with the idea that a bright and personable candidate can be trained up much more easily than a lazy or entitled candidate with the "right" bonafides can be brought around on their weaknesses.

Let everyone you trust know that you're looking--parish, neighbors, gym buddies, etc. You've got a skillset that should transfer well to a lot of different industries. You just need to find someone who's willing to give you some work/life balance. They're out there.
 
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