Another NCAA Lawsuit

irishroo

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Surprised I couldn't find an existing thread on this, if I missed it please delete/move this one.

Anti-trust claim filed by Jeffrey Kessler challenges NCAA amateur model - ESPN

Basically Jeffrey Kessler, who is actually a well known labor attorney who's worked with nearly every American pro sports league and was instrumental in the establishment of free agency in the NFL, filed an antitrust lawsuit against the NCAA alleging they are engaged in price fixing for college athletes. He wants there to be an open market for the services of college athletes. If there is somebody out there with the ability, firepower, and influence to get major changes made, Kessler may be the guy. What do you all think?
 

#1rish

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Jeff Kessler worked at the now-defunct law firm I worked at. Dude was probably one of the highest paid lawyers there. That being said, he's got a lot of influence and knows how the game works. Kessler's thought process: 1. File antitrust suit 2. Get colleges to pay athletes 3. Get athletes/boosters to pay him for getting them money. Personally, I think it's silly to pay college athletes, they're already getting a friggin free education.
 

irishroo

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Interesting that your post didn't get any responses. I saw this commentary from Grantland this afternoon.

Adam Silver, College Basketball, and Two Problems With One Solution «

The solution is simple. Do not pay college athletes, but let them sign their own endorsement deals. Done.

Good article. I agree with what he's saying, allowing the top players to sign endorsement deals does make a lot of sense. That said, how does his solution in any way fix the issue that athletes have been complaining about for years - namely that colleges make a ton of money off of them and they aren't compensated for it. Just cause Nike will pay Jabari Parker $5 million a year doesn't mean Duke isn't still making a ton of money off him, so wouldn't the NCAA and its member institutions still be vulnerable to lawsuit?
 

wizards8507

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Good article. I agree with what he's saying, allowing the top players to sign endorsement deals does make a lot of sense. That said, how does his solution in any way fix the issue that athletes have been complaining about for years - namely that colleges make a ton of money off of them and they aren't compensated for it. Just cause Nike will pay Jabari Parker $5 million a year doesn't mean Duke isn't still making a ton of money off him, so wouldn't the NCAA and its member institutions still be vulnerable to lawsuit?

Nah. That would be like a GM employee suing because GM makes a ton of money. The antitrust law comes into play because the NCAA blocks the players from realizing their market value, not that compensation should be coming from the schools themselves.

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