Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Biden Presidency

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • ulukinatme
    replied
    Oops.



    Leave a comment:


  • TorontoGold
    replied
    If Joey and Putin fall in love, or if Putin tells him that he didn't do it will that get cheers from the same crowd who loved that a couple years ago?

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Originally posted by drayer54 View Post

    I'm sure our 78-year-old President is all over the challenges being presented by these cyber attacks. We're probably labeling them as racist and sexist right this minute and burying them with a solar panel.
    He's said Putin knows he means business. We should find out next week.

    Leave a comment:


  • drayer54
    replied
    Originally posted by Irish#1 View Post

    COVID is under control. Uncle Joe needs to put on his big boy pants and call out Putin on these attacks.
    I'm sure our 78-year-old President is all over the challenges being presented by these cyber attacks. We're probably labeling them as racist and sexist right this minute and burying them with a solar panel.

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Three immediate thoughts..........

    Companies need to deploy GEO fencing in their firewalls, then build their exception list.

    There is no quantifiable reason to stop meat production. Get out the pen and paper and write the stuff down. Enter it into the system after you get it back up.

    COVID is under control. Uncle Joe needs to put on his big boy pants and call out Putin on these attacks.
    Last edited by Irish#1; 06-02-2021, 06:33 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ulukinatme
    replied
    First gas, now meat. It's almost like they're trying to pave the way for the Green New Deal.



    Intelligence needs to get their heads out of their asses. Quit screwing around trying to track down boomers that took selfies on the Capitol steps and go after these punks.

    Last edited by ulukinatme; 06-01-2021, 10:52 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Polish Leppy 22
    replied
    Originally posted by GowerND11 View Post

    My vote is Lancaster! haha. If I had found a teaching job right out of college (Millersville '11), I'd have stayed there. Close enough to everywhere, easy access to the Turnpike and Amtrak runs right to Philly. Big enough to have some culture, historical city, but also small enough towns that it's not overwhelming. Plus everyone is so damn nice.
    Lived there from 2015 to 2018. Loved it. Wish I could get back there. My fiance's brother got married there two weeks ago at a barn. Because...Lancaster.

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    That is sad.
    Last edited by Irish#1; 06-01-2021, 01:57 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • drayer54
    replied
    Marines are big fans of green energy and virtue signaling.



    Kamala Harris Bombs at the Naval Academy

    -https://www.wsj.com/articles/kamala-harris-bombs-at-the-naval-academy-11622476283

    Leave a comment:


  • GowerND11
    replied
    Originally posted by Polish Leppy 22 View Post

    Yes sir. We're in KOP and the market (even going out to Lancaster now) is nauseating.
    My vote is Lancaster! haha. If I had found a teaching job right out of college (Millersville '11), I'd have stayed there. Close enough to everywhere, easy access to the Turnpike and Amtrak runs right to Philly. Big enough to have some culture, historical city, but also small enough towns that it's not overwhelming. Plus everyone is so damn nice.

    Leave a comment:


  • Polish Leppy 22
    replied
    Originally posted by NorthDakota View Post

    Load up a Penske truck and drive west. Don't stop until you cross the Mississippi River, ideally keep going until you cross the Red River of the North. Stop before crossing the Missouri River.

    You'll be happy you did.
    Haha. Funny story...I worked for Penske for a few years. The truck leasing side, not the racing side.

    Leave a comment:


  • NorthDakota
    replied
    Originally posted by Polish Leppy 22 View Post

    Yes sir. We're in KOP and the market (even going out to Lancaster now) is nauseating.
    Load up a Penske truck and drive west. Don't stop until you cross the Mississippi River, ideally keep going until you cross the Red River of the North. Stop before crossing the Missouri River.

    You'll be happy you did.

    Leave a comment:


  • Polish Leppy 22
    replied
    Originally posted by GowerND11 View Post

    You still living near Philly? I can only imagine what Bucks, Montgomery, and Delaware counties are going through right now (assuming that's where you're looking).
    Yes sir. We're in KOP and the market (even going out to Lancaster now) is nauseating.

    Leave a comment:


  • ulukinatme
    replied
    Originally posted by Irish#1 View Post

    In Indy it's both. They're building apartment buildings downtown like crazy. Within two miles from my house five subdivisions (1,100 homes) are going up. The streets out here are still narrow country roads with telephone poles right up against the road. The schools and infrastructure aren't ready for it. Zoning commission recommended the plans be denied, but the city county approved them. Said it was going to happen sooner or later so it might as well be now. Tax revenue baby.
    Yup, they're never ready, but they absolutely will take the tax dollars now and figure it out later. About 25 years ago the city my parents moved to was one of the fastest growing in Ohio. They had built a new high school about 6 years prior and had already outgrown it in that time and we're converting it to a junior high to make room for another new high school. They later added on to the new high school as well, and built some new elementaries. About the time the new elementaries were built though the population was ageing out...all those new families were grown up and the kids were off to college. They ended up having to close one of the schools because there weren't enough kids lol. Just poor planning and forecasting all around.

    Leave a comment:


  • GowerND11
    replied
    Originally posted by Polish Leppy 22 View Post

    Spot on. New Yorkers ruin everything, even other states they go to haha
    You still living near Philly? I can only imagine what Bucks, Montgomery, and Delaware counties are going through right now (assuming that's where you're looking).

    Leave a comment:


  • Wild Bill
    replied
    Originally posted by Polish Leppy 22 View Post

    My fiance and I are in that group. Been actively looking for 6 months and there's a lot of stupid money being thrown around for homes. We only offered on one house, offered $20k over asking and it sold for $35k over asking. House wasn't worth that number but it's happening every day. Not sure what's worse...burning money in rent every month or grossly overspending on the house/ mortgage.
    Sometimes renting saves you money in the end.

    If I was in your position right now, I'd try to rent month to month and continue to save/wait for the market pullback.

    I think you'll see an increase in supply of homes towards the end of 2021. Foreclosure moratorium ends in on June 30th and some attorneys I know that work in foreclosure believe there could be an explosion of filings if these banks don't agree to loan modifications. Basically, it could work out where you see some foreclosures or short sales hitting the market towards the end of the year. A foreclosure boom should bring the prices down as well.

    People with children are less inclined to buy once the school year starts so you could see a slight decrease in demand as we get closer to August. That can cut both ways as people with children are less inclined to sell during the school year but I think it typically reduces demand more than supply.

    My opinion, which isn't worth much, is focus less on money you are theoretically losing paying rent and focus more on buying at the right time, saving and buying a home you can afford on one income.

    One more thing - it takes some nerve and it's not likely to work out but if you like or want a home that is not currently listed, knock on their door and tell them that you are interested in buying it if they ever decide to sell. Just tell them that you like their home and the community. At best, they may take you up on the offer, at worst they'll think you're insane. I've done this a few times and nobody has ever been offended b/c I liked their home enough to make an offer.

    I bought a house in January of 2021 doing something like this. A friend of mine noticed moving trucks at a house near his and the next day a contractor was there doing some work. I went over to the place and the contractor told me he was going to flip the place. I asked him to buy it as is and he agreed. I saved myself commission fees, was able to negotiate price without competition, he made some money and I got the place for a great price given the market.
    Last edited by Wild Bill ; 05-27-2021, 01:26 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • PerthDomer
    replied
    Originally posted by Irish#1 View Post

    In Indy it's both. They're building apartment buildings downtown like crazy. Within two miles from my house five subdivisions (1,100 homes) are going up. The streets out here are still narrow country roads with telephone poles right up against the road. The schools and infrastructure aren't ready for it. Zoning commission recommended the plans be denied, but the city county approved them. Said it was going to happen sooner or later so it might as well be now. Tax revenue baby.
    Dense construction has much lower cost to infrastructure than building far flung suburbs. We're getting a ton of apartment construction in seattle thanks to an upzone which will hopefully make rents cheaper and reduce homelessness.

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Originally posted by PerthDomer View Post

    You have a lot of millenial renters trying to become home owners. The demand for renting has gone down as the demand for housing has gone up. This has led to increased home building and such. At some point the market will rebalance.
    In Indy it's both. They're building apartment buildings downtown like crazy. Within two miles from my house five subdivisions (1,100 homes) are going up. The streets out here are still narrow country roads with telephone poles right up against the road. The schools and infrastructure aren't ready for it. Zoning commission recommended the plans be denied, but the city county approved them. Said it was going to happen sooner or later so it might as well be now. Tax revenue baby.

    Leave a comment:


  • Polish Leppy 22
    replied
    Originally posted by GowerND11 View Post

    I keep telling my fiance how lucky we were to buy our house in the summer of '19 because of what's going on. My best friend's brother just told me about how much of a struggle it is for him and his wife. They've bid on about 4/5 houses so far in the Lehigh Valley here in PA. Houses that are 300K+, very beautiful affluent area. They've been outbid each time by 20-40K with CASH offers. Apparently, a lot of people are coming to that area from NY and NJ, selling their houses for 500-600K and moving to the "less expensive" Pennsylvania.
    Spot on. New Yorkers ruin everything, even other states they go to haha

    Leave a comment:


  • GowerND11
    replied
    Originally posted by Polish Leppy 22 View Post

    My fiance and I are in that group. Been actively looking for 6 months and there's a lot of stupid money being thrown around for homes. We only offered on one house, offered $20k over asking and it sold for $35k over asking. House wasn't worth that number but it's happening every day. Not sure what's worse...burning money in rent every month or grossly overspending on the house/ mortgage.
    I keep telling my fiance how lucky we were to buy our house in the summer of '19 because of what's going on. My best friend's brother just told me about how much of a struggle it is for him and his wife. They've bid on about 4/5 houses so far in the Lehigh Valley here in PA. Houses that are 300K+, very beautiful affluent area. They've been outbid each time by 20-40K with CASH offers. Apparently, a lot of people are coming to that area from NY and NJ, selling their houses for 500-600K and moving to the "less expensive" Pennsylvania.

    Leave a comment:


  • ulukinatme
    replied

    Leave a comment:


  • Polish Leppy 22
    replied
    Originally posted by PerthDomer View Post

    You have a lot of millenial renters trying to become home owners. The demand for renting has gone down as the demand for housing has gone up. This has led to increased home building and such. At some point the market will rebalance.
    My fiance and I are in that group. Been actively looking for 6 months and there's a lot of stupid money being thrown around for homes. We only offered on one house, offered $20k over asking and it sold for $35k over asking. House wasn't worth that number but it's happening every day. Not sure what's worse...burning money in rent every month or grossly overspending on the house/ mortgage.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wild Bill
    replied
    Originally posted by PerthDomer View Post

    You have a lot of millenial renters trying to become home owners. The demand for renting has gone down as the demand for housing has gone up. This has led to increased home building and such. At some point the market will rebalance.
    This may be true in some areas but I've seen an increase in demand, a decrease in supply, or maybe both, with respect to rentals. I've rented three places out within the past year - I rented a one bedroom and I had a line of 20 people or so waiting to see the place. I rented it for 15% more than I originally anticipated. I increased rent on a 4 bed by a little more than 15% and a three bed by 20% without an issue. Prices have been stagnant for years so the increases are relatively dramatic.

    I would wait to buy a vacation house. Prices tank as soon as there is any downward pressure on the market/economy.

    Leave a comment:


  • PerthDomer
    replied
    Originally posted by Irish#1 View Post

    It has to crash eventually. The price of lumber has driven up the costs of new homes that even paying over market value for an existing home is still better than building new. I stopped at Lowes to grab a 2 X 4 the other day. The price was over $5 for a single board.
    You have a lot of millenial renters trying to become home owners. The demand for renting has gone down as the demand for housing has gone up. This has led to increased home building and such. At some point the market will rebalance.

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Originally posted by drayer54 View Post


    While I do like watching my neighbors get 50k over ask on the first day with waived inspections and guaranteed cash over appraisal, this isn't sustainable. We're going to need those basic income checks from J-Powell and Joe soon just to maintain our standard of living. I've been looking at summer vacations lately too and that sure isn't going to be cheap.
    It has to crash eventually. The price of lumber has driven up the costs of new homes that even paying over market value for an existing home is still better than building new. I stopped at Lowes to grab a 2 X 4 the other day. The price was over $5 for a single board.

    Leave a comment:


  • drayer54
    replied
    Originally posted by ulukinatme View Post
    Oops. This goes in the bucket with the promise recently walked back on student loan debt. Vote for me!

    That reminds me of the Pipefitter Union that spent money pushing Biden and then turned around and shed members week 1 after his Exec Orders. Whoops.



    Demand for homes has prices soaring across sizzling U.S. market

    America’s housing market has grown so overheated as demand outpaces supply that prices keep hitting record highs — and roughly half of all U.S. houses are now selling above their list price.

    Two years ago, before the pandemic struck, just a quarter of homes were selling above the sellers’ asking price, according to data from the real estate brokerage Redfin.

    On Tuesday, new data further illuminated the red-hot nature of the housing market: Prices rose in March at the fastest pace in more than seven years. The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index jumped 13.3% that month compared with a year earlier — the biggest such gain since December 2013. That price surge followed a 12% year-over-year jump in February.
    While I do like watching my neighbors get 50k over ask on the first day with waived inspections and guaranteed cash over appraisal, this isn't sustainable. We're going to need those basic income checks from J-Powell and Joe soon just to maintain our standard of living. I've been looking at summer vacations lately too and that sure isn't going to be cheap.

    Leave a comment:


  • ulukinatme
    replied
    Originally posted by drayer54 View Post

    Journalists are busy right now. Half are still fawning over the Bidens and writing admiration stories while the other half is 15 months behind Sen. Tom Cotton on the Wuhan Lab origins and shifting from "Fact-Checking" Republicans to "suddenly" recognizing they may have been right.

    Journalism. Is. Dead.
    Remember when Romney was asked who our greatest geopolitical foe was, he replied Russia, and the left all laughed? Always two steps behind on the important stuff. Turns out Trump was right on a lot of stuff too like border security, but damn those mean Tweets!

    Leave a comment:


  • ulukinatme
    replied
    Oops. This goes in the bucket with the promise recently walked back on student loan debt. Vote for me!

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Originally posted by Wild Bill View Post

    Maybe it has something to do with the billions of dollars in aid and weapons we give them. It's almost like our tax dollars are being used to bribe the ruling class of these ME nations so they agree to play nice with Israel. Meanwhile, we're broke.
    That's pretty much what I meant by tolerate each other. lol We can't be broke. Joe wants to spend over a trillion.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wild Bill
    replied
    Originally posted by Irish#1 View Post

    No, they just tolerate each other because they don't want a war.
    Maybe it has something to do with the billions of dollars in aid and weapons we give them. It's almost like our tax dollars are being used to bribe the ruling class of these ME nations so they agree to play nice with Israel. Meanwhile, we're broke.

    Leave a comment:


  • drayer54
    replied
    Originally posted by Irish#1 View Post

    Didn't expect anything like that from the WSJ. Everything will be fine. After all, CNN did write an article supporting Mrs. Biden and her style of clothes.
    Journalists are busy right now. Half are still fawning over the Bidens and writing admiration stories while the other half is 15 months behind Sen. Tom Cotton on the Wuhan Lab origins and shifting from "Fact-Checking" Republicans to "suddenly" recognizing they may have been right.

    Journalism. Is. Dead.

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Originally posted by drayer54 View Post
    Spot on piece from the WSJ-
    Did Biden Peak on Inauguration Day?

    Covid confusion, Mideast chaos and the threat of inflation—he doesn’t have many victories to point to.
    Didn't expect anything like that from the WSJ. Everything will be fine. After all, CNN did write an article supporting Mrs. Biden and her style of clothes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Originally posted by PerthDomer View Post

    Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia are all basically allied w them. Iran's the threat and no one is saber rattling on their border any more outside of Iranians assets in Syria/Lebanon.
    No, they just tolerate each other because they don't want a war.

    Leave a comment:


  • ulukinatme
    replied
    Originally posted by drayer54 View Post
    Spot on piece from the WSJ-
    Did Biden Peak on Inauguration Day?

    Covid confusion, Mideast chaos and the threat of inflation—he doesn’t have many victories to point to.
    Inflation is a nothing burger! I have it on good authority by "Circle Back" Jen and our Canadian friend that there is nothing to fear from inflation, despite left leaning WaPo and NYT both posting a number of articles saying otherwise recently.

    Leave a comment:


  • drayer54
    replied
    Spot on piece from the WSJ-
    Did Biden Peak on Inauguration Day?

    Covid confusion, Mideast chaos and the threat of inflation—he doesn’t have many victories to point to.

    During the Chicago Cubs’ long century of futility, the old joke was that every year they peaked on Opening Day. Is it too early to wonder if Joe Biden’s presidency did the same thing?

    The inauguration promise to bring healing to a fractured nation didn’t last the short ride back down Pennsylvania Avenue on Jan. 20. But what of the real Biden project that was revealed once the festivities ended: the transformation of America into a land of equity and inclusion, one that Michelle Obama could finally be proud of, that Bernie Sanders could count as Cuba’s equal, and where LeBron James could feel safe and fairly rewarded

    True, it’s no longer Opening Day, but we haven’t reached the All-Star break and already reality has bitten the geniuses in this White House harder than old Major the German shepherd did. Unlike Major, this fickle beast can’t be safely dispatched from the executive mansion and forgotten about. It has a painful way of telling you what happens when you construct an ideological dreamscape made up of impossible promises, implausible assertions and dishonest propositions.

    Last week reminded us on multiple fronts that trying to govern on a prospectus of large claims at odds with the defiant reality is a perilous mission.

    The sudden change in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s mask advice has undermined the administration’s claim to be governed at all times by data and facts. It has revealed to a wider audience what some of us knew all along: that pious claims about “following the science” were as flimsy as a cloth face covering. We’d been told for four months that vaccinations don’t necessarily protect against viral transmission. The CDC’s director warned a few weeks ago about “impending doom.” The president said “neanderthal thinking” drove governors to lift mandates. Suddenly, everything has changed—except for federal mask mandates, which officials began to ease only on Monday.

    But with the Biden administration leading from behind, many states and businesses relaxed or abolished their mask rules. That prompted dismay by many of the president’s most loyal supporters. They took to TV studios and social media to bewail the betrayal. The mask had been the most joylessly visible way of signaling one’s virtue since sackcloth and ashes. Now it will be easier to tell the righteous from the deplorable, but millions will stray from the path of redemption.

    The crisis in the Middle East is another unwelcome intrusion of reality into the wonder world of Democratic progressivism.

    Leftist Democrats, whose demands the president has so dutifully followed so far, don’t like Israel. They see the Palestinian cause as an extension of the equity and racial-justice objectives they’re busy pursuing at home.

    The dwindling reality-based community inside the Biden administration knows better and can’t yet abandon the logic that Israel has a right to defend itself from Hamas rockets. But with a progressive wing to please, an Iran deal back at the heart of their foreign-policy objectives, and an Israel-hostile international “community” to appease, they’re in a deepening hole that threatens their wider Middle East aspirations.

    The most explosive collision with reality is in economics. It’s hard to recall a week of official data that more directly challenged the entire governing premise of a fledgling administration than what arrived in early May.

    The sharp slowdown in job growth, uptick in unemployment, and biggest leap in retail prices in more than a decade was a reminder about the immutability of certain economic truths.

    It was only a month’s worth of data; we’d need more evidence before declaring an emergency. But plenty of intelligent people have been warning that this could happen if you committed to multiple spending binges in an economy as unpredictably disrupted as the post-pandemic one.

    Supply bottlenecks have been driving up prices, and with the economy reopening employers are desperate for workers. Being paid to stay home is proving to have predictable consequences for the availability of labor. All this may or may not be “transitory” as the Fed insists it is.

    But perhaps most worrying and suggestive of stagflation is a growing mismatch between the pool of available labor and the demand for it. Companies have shed millions of jobs in the last year—and many improved their profitability. They will be slow to return to their old payrolls if they ever do. Demographic trends are also stagflationary—with fewer working-age Americans available to support the growing proportion of the population less likely to work.

    Leave a comment:


  • NorthDakota
    replied
    Originally posted by PerthDomer View Post

    Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia are all basically allied w them. Iran's the threat and no one is saber rattling on their border any more outside of Iranians assets in Syria/Lebanon.
    TIL that a country without diplomatic relations with Israel is "basically allied" with them.

    I get that Israel isn't at the same risk of some regional Arabic invasion anymore, but the whole "oh they are allies with their neighbors" is just not true.

    Leave a comment:


  • drayer54
    replied


    I was reliably informed America was now respected around the world again.

    Leave a comment:


  • PerthDomer
    replied
    Originally posted by NorthDakota View Post

    Uhhhh.... they don't have Arab allies.
    Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia are all basically allied w them. Iran's the threat and no one is saber rattling on their border any more outside of Iranians assets in Syria/Lebanon.

    Leave a comment:


  • NorthDakota
    replied
    Originally posted by PerthDomer View Post

    Israel's not the outmanned country surrounded by foes. They have allies in the arabs, military superiority, and the Palestinian situation sucks. Culturally Jewish people tend to be secular, educated, liberal philosophically etc. It makes sense they'd back a liberal party as long as it isn't directly hostile to Israel.
    Uhhhh.... they don't have Arab allies.

    Leave a comment:


  • PerthDomer
    replied
    Originally posted by ulukinatme View Post
    I think the anti-Israel sentiment among the Democrats has been going on longer than since the Squad came around. They weren't happy when Trump recognized Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and there was rumblings long before that. It honestly puzzles me that most Jewish voters are very blue...in fact they haven't supported a Conservative since 1920 and it hasn't been close since other than Reagan. It's honestly all puzzling when Israel is a big ally and Palestine allows Hamas to control the country and raise their kids with terrorist kid shows to push their propaganda.
    Israel's not the outmanned country surrounded by foes. They have allies in the arabs, military superiority, and the Palestinian situation sucks. Culturally Jewish people tend to be secular, educated, liberal philosophically etc. It makes sense they'd back a liberal party as long as it isn't directly hostile to Israel.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wild Bill
    replied
    Does anyone have a quick rundown of the new tax credit policy? A good article or whatever.

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied

    “quiet, relentless diplomacy”.......Made me chuckle


    A radical change’: America’s new generation of pro-Palestinian voices

    Progressive coalition could be become counterweight to pro-Israeli traditions of Democratic party. It just so happened that Joe Biden was due to visit Detroit, home to the biggest Arab American community in the country, at the height of the latest upsurge in Israeli-Palestinian violence.

    The sight of the presidential motorcade on Tuesday passing through a protest bedecked with Palestinian flags – and of Biden himself in heated discussion with Rashida Tlaib, the first Palestinian woman to be elected to Congress, on the Detroit airport tarmac – vividly illustrated the rapid shifts underway in US politics.

    Welcoming Friday’s ceasefire, Biden said he would continue what he called his “quiet, relentless diplomacy”. But his emphasis through 11 days of bombs, rockets and bloodshed, on Israel’s right to self-defence, his refusal to demand a ceasefire or to join a UN security council statement to that effect, have exacted a political cost in the very constituency that was decisive in getting him elected.

    Biden’s meek stance on Gaza ceasefire does little to quell progressive ire

    Read more
    In many ways, Biden was following a well-trodden path for US presidents, but the political downside of doing so is much greater now than it would have been just a few years ago, before a new generation of Democrats such as Tlaib arrived in Congress, and before the Black Lives Matter campaign made common cause with the Palestinians.

    The same broad coalition that saved Biden’s primary campaign and helped get him across the line in November, could now become a powerful counterweight to the pro-Israeli traditions of the Democratic party.

    “We’re in a moment of profound flux in society in general and things are moving very, very quickly and sometimes it takes moments like these to see how far things have shifted,” said Abdul El-Sayed, an epidemiologist, formerly Detroit’s former health director and candidate for governor, who addressed the protesters in Michigan on Tuesday.

    “Joe Biden has, throughout his political history, been very, very good at reading the changes in temperature that occur, and I hope that he registers the fact that the base has also moved on this issue.”

    Also in the crowd on Tuesday was Reuben Telushkin, a Black Jewish activist who is national organiser for Jewish Voices for Peace (JVP). He said the Black Lives Matter movement has reinforced an alliance between Palestinians and African Americans.

    “People were connecting in the streets, connecting online and so pre-existing solidarities were deepening, but also average, maybe more apathetic folks, were being politicised,” Telushkin said.

    He pointed to the impact of protests in Ferguson in 2014, when it was discovered the same US-made tear gas canisters were being used on Black American demonstrators in Missouri and against Palestinians on the West Bank.

    “Palestinians were demonstrating their solidarity by sending tweets to the protesters in Ferguson about how to treat tear gas,” Telushkin said. “So it was a really material link.”

    A new vocabulary has entered the US debate on Israel and Palestine, particularly since Human Rights Watch published a report last month that described the status quo as apartheid, a description that echoed on the floor of the House of Representatives and on MSNBC by presenter Ali Velshi.

    “That is a radical change. Normally you’d be at risk of losing your job if you spoke up for Palestinian human rights,” said Edward Ahmed Mitchell, the deputy executive director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

    The models Bella and Gigi Hadid, whose father was born in Palestine, used their social media platforms, with a combined following of 108 million, to highlight the plight of the people of Gaza and the West Bank.

    “This political activism has been building for decades,” said Salih Booker, president of the Center for International Policy. “It’s hard to point to exactly what grain of sand has now been added to this side of the scales, but I think we’re approaching a new tipping point where the entire debate is being reframed.”

    Beth Miller, government affairs manager for JVP Action, the group’s political advocacy arm, said: “This idea that you could be ‘progressive except for Palestine’ is falling apart, and people understand that now there is no such thing as ‘progressive except for Palestine’.”

    US public sympathies are still mostly with the Israelis rather than the Palestinians. The ratio was 58% to 25% in a Gallup poll in March, but that still reflected a steady swing towards the Palestinians over recent years and the survey was taken before the most recent eruption of violence.

    Similarly the centre of gravity in the Democratic party is still sympathetic towards Biden’s approach, but the direction of change is away from the reflexive support for Israel that has been the president’s hallmark throughout his long political career.

    As a sign of things to come, progressives point to the ouster of the formerly powerful, pro-Israel chair of the House foreign affairs committee, Eliot Engel, by a political newcomer, Jamaal Bowman, in a Democratic primary last July. Bowman has since supported a bill that would regulate US military aid to Israel.

    “The conversation has to change before the policy can change,” Mitchell said. “And right now we are seeing a radical change in the conversation surrounding Palestine.”

    Leave a comment:


  • ulukinatme
    replied
    I think the anti-Israel sentiment among the Democrats has been going on longer than since the Squad came around. They weren't happy when Trump recognized Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and there was rumblings long before that. It honestly puzzles me that most Jewish voters are very blue...in fact they haven't supported a Conservative since 1920 and it hasn't been close since other than Reagan. It's honestly all puzzling when Israel is a big ally and Palestine allows Hamas to control the country and raise their kids with terrorist kid shows to push their propaganda.

    Leave a comment:


  • drayer54
    replied
    Originally posted by NorthDakota View Post
    Been another tough week on Grandpa Joe lol
    The Dems have hinted at shifts in their views towards Israel in the last few years. Iowa Democrat Axne speaking at the J Street group started a trend of more open anti-Israel sentiment. Obviously, Ilhan Omar and the likes have their opinions. Biden having to manage a party at odds over Israel in this conflict is interesting. I'm sure Netanyahu is going to grin at Biden and do what he wants, and he should.

    Leave a comment:


  • NorthDakota
    replied
    Been another tough week on Grandpa Joe lol

    Leave a comment:


  • Bishop2b5
    replied
    Yikes! That was sad/pathetic/funny!? Biden raises awkwardness and just generally being a witless dolt to new levels.

    Leave a comment:


  • ulukinatme
    replied
    Ouch

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Originally posted by drayer54 View Post

    All plausible. There's a whole industry now set up for Ransomware attack support and insurance. I expect Awl N' Gas to get a whole lot more help regulating their cyber infrastructure in the near term and to get regulated like electricity. The skeptic in me thinks they wanted more than cash. The Biden pipeline decision goes against the administration's previous opposition. 4 years ago we would have a 24/7 news cycle asking what kompromat Putin has if something like this happened. Weird timing ahead of the Arctic Summit too.
    It's more than plausible. Cyber security is under my domain. I've sat in on a lot of conferences and it's always about the money. They want to minimize their exposure and risk. Trying to take control would bring the wrath of the federal government down upon them and they don't want to spend time locked up. As these attacks have increased, more insurance companies are getting out of the cyber insurance business. Those that are providing it have put a lot more restrictions in place for filing a claim and the premiums have quadrupled in the last year.

    BTW.....I lived it first hand. We went through an attack back in November. Assholes wanted $1.3M from us. They got zilch. We had our primary systems back online in three days. When companies stop paying the ransom, their business would dry up. Government needs to make it illegal to pay a ransom.

    Leave a comment:


  • Armyirish47
    replied
    Originally posted by drayer54 View Post

    Yeah, you're right. Army didn't make that press release on climate change, DoD is totally not pushing a left-wing narrative on the military, and the Space Force is totally consistent on what views are OK in public. I'm completely making this up.

    In separate news:
    Looks like more Bitcoin is headed to Russia.
    https://www.ajc.com/news/nation-worl...DPZHA5PVR7GZY/
    I know I'm being trolled but I have a few minutes this morning soooooooooo

    The press release on climate change didn't "reveal" anything. The military has been focused on climate change for decades as a destabilizing factor around the globe. Rushing to the nearest fainting couch to declare this is somehow new and as the article carefully states once you get past the....click bait headline....is that it "appears to be" tied to a new priority. Nice job author! The Blaze gonna Blaze, I especially like the poll in the middle of the article asking the trusty reader what scares them most (spoiler alert, Democrats in Power is the overwhelming winner).

    And I'm sure that "back in your day" the military was super focused on putting green tanks in Europe across from yellow tanks in Europe and making big gun go BrrrrrrpppppP!!!!!!!!! WARGARGL!!!!!! and that somehow meant combat readiness and mission execution? lolwut? How can you achieve readiness if you aren't prepared for what missions look like or even acknowledge that missions change over time? In 2010 there indeed was a joint operating environment document that was produced that highlighted climate change as a trend that could influence the worlds security. That section came right before a discussion of pandemics and cyber threats, whew boy can you imagine? Your response was the kind of nonsense thing that people throw out to sound like they know something deep and meaningful. Instead the Specialist has no clothes.

    So we've got the beautiful combination of "back in my day guy" and "I know a guy" guy dropping hot knowledge from their echo chambers. A dream come true. .

    Leave a comment:


  • drayer54
    replied
    Originally posted by Irish#1 View Post

    Hardening simply means they were implementing additional security measures. The small interruption could have been the new security measures (software) mistook some normal program functions as actual virus activity so they need to whitelist the program or executable. Threat Actors (hackers) rarely take control of a system. The vast majority simply encrypt the servers preventing you from accessing the data. The problem is they paid to get their systems back up and running. Attackers may provide them with the encryption key to unlock the system(s), but that's all they do. They will not remove the malicious software. If you don't find it, they can come back in and do it again. There is also a good chance they will sell the entry access on the dark web so you're still open for an attack. Them paying the ransom told me they do not have the proper recovery measures in place.
    All plausible. There's a whole industry now set up for Ransomware attack support and insurance. I expect Awl N' Gas to get a whole lot more help regulating their cyber infrastructure in the near term and to get regulated like electricity. The skeptic in me thinks they wanted more than cash. The Biden pipeline decision goes against the administration's previous opposition. 4 years ago we would have a 24/7 news cycle asking what kompromat Putin has if something like this happened. Weird timing ahead of the Arctic Summit too.

    Leave a comment:

Adsense

Collapse
Working...
X