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  • That sounds really hopeful. It's a mirror of what the new presidency is hoping to set up all over. Then, if we can get the health crew in enough numbers, all we'll need is the ramped up dosage quantities. These sorts of things are do-able and I'm getting a bit more optimistic. We BADLY needed organization vertically here.

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    • Originally posted by Old Man Mike View Post
      That sounds really hopeful. It's a mirror of what the new presidency is hoping to set up all over. Then, if we can get the health crew in enough numbers, all we'll need is the ramped up dosage quantities. These sorts of things are do-able and I'm getting a bit more optimistic. We BADLY needed organization vertically here.
      Very true about needing the organization. These megahubs weren't even a thing until last week. This is their first week in operation. Seems like the states are having to do trial and error to figure out what would be most efficient to distribute. Texas passed the 1 million vaccinated point in the last few days, so like you said, there's hope as the states are starting to figure it out. Reading local media, the plan is to start increasing the amount of vaccines distributed as the centers get more efficient. From getting in line to leaving, it took about 35 minutes. They had 4 separate lines going with about 10 cars total in each lane between the two tents.
      MZ is the QB for me!!!!

      Comment


      • Originally posted by ulukinatme View Post
        My wife is a nurse too, but not on the front line in a hospital. She used to do assisted living, but just recently she moved to a small clinic nearby for a shorter drive. Now it's COVID tests all day for her, so she definitely gets exposed more often than her previous job. They'll have 15 or more positive cases in a day right now. I'm sorry to hear your wife was infected, I pray for her speedy recovery and for your unborn.

        Knowing what I know now I probably wouldn't have done much of anything differently with my son. He still would have been absolutely vaccinated, but I probably would have gone with a slightly delayed schedule as we did with my 3rd child. Studies have shown regression only occurs 10% of the time after they're past age 3. Other than that, I have no regrets. They always say early intervention is important, but it doesn't necessarily mean victories either. We took my son to his doctor early with questions and they seemed to think he was on target for normal development despite his regression. We went back after six months or so later to a different doctor and got a completely different diagnosis, then immediately put him into speech and occupational therapies. That crap is expensive...and unfortunately he hasn't gotten anything really out of it in the years since to be honest. I can't say we didn't at least try, so there's no what if's. Last year his speech therapist swore he was close to a breakthrough, but since then nothing has changed and so we're going to quit throwing money at the issue for now. It just feels like we've been strung along for this long, paying $50 or more for half hour sessions just feels like insanity when there's no real progress over the years. So, while they say early intervention is important, people shouldn't look at that as a guarantee either. Still, you have to do it if you're in that situation.

        It is what it is though. Every kid is different, that's why I count my blessings he's not worse off. You never know what can trigger him or what he'll enjoy. He somehow does incredibly well in sports bars with all the background noise, but Chuck E. Cheese with it's bells and noisy games has proven to be a problem on 2 out of 3 trips (The other visit was awesome, no idea why). He absolutely loves the water, to a point we have to be extra diligent up at Lake Erie at my grandparent's cottage because he will sneak off the second your back is turned. We've found he hates being at the front of stores with automatic doors, because to him all doors must be shut at home or away and if the automatic doors are constantly opening and staying open it drives him crazy for whatever reason. It makes you want to avoid public places all together to avoid these kinds of stimulants, but then you take a chance and take him horseback riding near Gatlinburg only to find out he absolutely loves it and he giggles for an entire hour straight. Boggles the mind.

        The good outweighs the bad though, even if the bad can be incredibly frustrating and mentally break you down at times. When he's happy, which I said is most of the time, he has a sweet personality that just wants to be squeezed (sort of like compression therapy but with hugs) and tickled. Most of the students in his Abilities First class are fairly verbal and neurotypical in some way outside of some social ticks, but his teacher says she wishes she had a whole class of Landons because of his personality. When he gets giggly for no reason it can be infectious and those are moments you enjoy.

        <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vR0HUZNxoH4" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
        Hey, screw you man. Now my wife is looking at me and just asked: "Are... are you crying?"

        "No... no."

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        • Originally posted by Old Man Mike View Post
          This is nowhere near the level of importance as Uluk's post, but just news.

          I literally (20 minutes ago) got the COVID vaccine. I'd like to thank modern technology for the creation of very sharp needles, as I didn't even feel the inoculation.

          My arm is not sore. In fact I can't tell that the vaccination happened unless I focus attention just on the spot. Several of my friends here at The Fountains have told me the same thing. (Our whole village was down to get it.) One said it hurt. He is a fellow whose one flaw is that he likes to mention bad things about his health, so take that for what it's worth.

          My only current feeling is the urge to eat cheeseburgers .... but then I always have that urge.
          My wife got her second shot (Pfizer) the other day. She felt really tired, had the chills for about an hour, and then slept it off. She was fine the next day. Two of her co-workers had the same reaction, one got really sick (fever, chills, total energy loss) then bounced back on day two, and two had no reaction. If I had to guess, I would guess that the one who got really sick will probably get the best antibody reaction.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by SonofOahu View Post
            Hey, screw you man. Now my wife is looking at me and just asked: "Are... are you crying?"

            "No... no."
            I'll allow it this time. Do it again and I'll make sure the lower 48 put a Whiskey and Cigar embargo on Hawaii. I dont care if its constitutional or not.
            Based Mullet Kid owns

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            • <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Today&#39;s must-read on the <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/COVID?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#COVID</a> vaccines. Basically, they&#39;re more effective, safer and offer a swifter return to normal life than you&#39;ve been told.<br><br>Read this and feel better --&gt;<a href="https://t.co/bHem0bJHQ6">https://t.co/bHem0bJHQ6</a> <a href="https://t.co/3EkDGT0mRq">pic.twitter.com/3EkDGT0mRq</a></p>&mdash; Matthew Benson (@MatthewWBenson) <a href="https://twitter.com/MatthewWBenson/status/1351247537722814472?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 18, 2021</a></blockquote> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

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              • Regarding Pfizer’s vaccine and how it responded to the new variant of the virus:

                New data back ability of Pfizer, BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine to foil UK strain
                (Ref: CNBC, Financial Post, Sky News, The Guardian, bioRxiv, Fidelity, London South East, GlobeNewswire, Bloomberg)
                January 20th, 2021
                By: Anna Bratulic
                Tags: Top Story BNT162b2 BioNTech Pfizer COVID-19 Immunisation Clinical Research (R&D) Medical Affairs

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                Pfizer and BioNTech on Wednesday reported results from another in-vitro study indicating that their COVID-19 vaccine BNT162b2 is likely capable of neutralising the rapidly spreading UK strain of SARS-CoV-2, also known as B.1.1.7. The findings, which were published on the preprint server bioRxiv, follow the release of a similar laboratory study earlier this month showing that antibodies from vaccinated people were able to efficiently neutralise variants of SARS-CoV-2 with a key mutation, dubbed N501Y, found in the UK variant, as well as another highly transmissible strain that has emerged in South Africa.

                The B.1.1.7 lineage, also referred to as VOC 202012/01, carries a "larger than usual number of genetic changes with 10 mutations located in the spike protein," the companies said, adding that in contrast with the first study, which focused on N501Y-mutant SARS-CoV-2, the current in-vitro work looked at the full set of UK strain spike mutations.

                Biologically 'equivalent' neutralisation

                For the latest study, pseudoviruses were generated bearing either the Wuhan reference strain or the B.1.1.7 lineage spike protein. Pfizer and BioNTech pointed out that while the pseudovirus system represents a surrogate for the real virus, there has been "excellent concordance" between pseudotype and SARS-CoV-2 neutralisation assays in previous studies.

                Researchers found that the sera of 16 participants in a previously reported German Phase I/II trial of BNT162b2 induced "equivalent" neutralising titers to both the UK strain and the unmutated Wuhan SARS-CoV-2 spike. These findings, "together with the combined immunity involving humoral and cellular effectors induced by this vaccine, make it unlikely that the B.1.1.7 lineage will escape BNT162b2-mediated protection," the authors said.

                Ready to adapt

                Pfizer and BioNTech's mRNA-based vaccine, which was found to be 95% effective in a Phase III trial after two doses given 21 days apart, is already authorised in several countries including the UK, US and Europe, where it is branded as Comirnaty. The companies say they are "encouraged" by the new study, but cautioned that more data are needed to monitor the vaccine's effectiveness at preventing COVID-19 caused by new variants. It is not yet clear what level of reduced efficacy would warrant a vaccine strain change, but they indicated that should such a change be necessary in the future, "the flexibility of BioNTech's proprietary mRNA vaccine platform is well suited to enable such adjustment."

                A separate study conducted by researchers in South Africa has raised concern that the South African variant of SARS-CoV-2 may be harder to protect against. The findings, which have not yet been peer-reviewed, showed that half of the blood samples from a handful of patients who already had COVID-19 do not have the antibodies needed to protect against the South African variant, while antibody levels in the other half were reduced and the risk of re-infection could not be determined. In yet another study, US scientists tested mutations found in the UK and South African variants, as well as a strain that has surfaced in Brazil, in blood samples from 20 volunteers who had received either the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine or Moderna's similar candidate, mRNA-1273. Their work, which was also presented in pre-print, showed the donors' blood samples were not quite as effective at neutralising the variants.

                Doubts on delayed dosing

                Meanwhile, researchers in Israel say the first real-world analysis of Pfizer and BioNTech's vaccine is casting doubt on the UK's policy to delay the second dose in order to stretch out supply, a move being considered in other countries as well, including the US. The Israeli scientists compared 200,000 people over the age of 60 who were vaccinated to a matched group of 200,000 unvaccinated individuals, and found no difference between the two groups until 14 days after the first immunisation was given, when the vaccinated group saw a 33% drop in infection rates. That contrasts with claims by UK scientists that the vaccine was 89% effective after only one dose, and is also lower than the 52% effectiveness reported by Pfizer and BioNTech for a single dose. The Israeli scientists also believe that the effectiveness of one dose of the vaccine in a real-world setting will rise when data is compiled from younger age groups.

                On the flip side, results reported recently from a serological trial of 102 people at Israel's Sheba Medical Center showed that a week after the second dose of Pfizer and BioNTech's vaccine, over 98% presented a much higher level of antibodies than required to be considered immune. Although a week before receiving the second dose, the study found that only 50% of those examined had levels of antibodies considered sufficient for protection.

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                • Last edited by ab2cmiller; 03-19-2021, 04:12 PM.

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                  • A country full of Alex Berensons would never get a pandemic under control. ... and why prematurely b!tch about someone trying to get started on helping out with a gigantic country-wide problem on day one in office? I guess that the B!tchtrain is just too much a part of some people's lives to let go --- even for a moment.

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                    • The day after our new president is sworn in now Maryland is rushing to get kids in school by March 1st. But this wasn’t political. Oh and it’s proven the school system doesn’t show an spread of Covid. Fuck you
                      Brotherhood may fade, but it will never run

                      Comment


                      • Haven’t a good amount of schools already figured out how to make it work with proper precautions and been going back to school at least in some form? Here in the Indy area, my one son in high school has been going to school this school year in person on an every other day schedule (they basically split the school in half, where half the kids go in person one day, while the other half Zooms), and my younger one In grade school has been in person full time since the beginning of the school year. I’d be interested to know what this looks like across the country percentage wise, but I just don’t see this as some ground breaking idea that a lot of schools haven’t already figured out how to adapt and overcome a while back.
                        I'm too drunk to taste this chicken.

                        Comment


                        • Transmission within schools isn't the problem, especially K-8. In general, schools are doing a phenomenal job. Outside of school activities are where this is spreading amongst the pediatric population. I don't have the time to link sources but you can find them if you look.

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                          • I am not convinced kids in school aren't partially behind the spread regardless of what studies showing no link between in-person learning and spread of COVID. Not many states publicly have good antibody data, but in states that do such as Florida for example, kids under 14 were 17.9% positive for antibodies. I personally think the harm of them being away from school (especially those pre-middle school) is way worse than them getting/spreading COVID. I'm moreso just saying even if kids are way less efficient at spreading the virus and don't typically get sick, I'm not 100% convinced they don't contribute to the spread how we've been led to believe just because it is hard to trace the mass amounts of asymptomatics that are clearly coming in these age groups.

                            I guess those positive for the antibodies may not have picked it up in school or even transmitted in school, but that is an awfully high number for seroprevalence. Edit: See IKWT just said that in the post above mine about it not being transmitted in school but in other activities.
                            Last edited by notredomer23; 01-21-2021, 03:28 PM.

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                            • Originally posted by notredomer23 View Post
                              I am not convinced kids in school aren't partially behind the spread regardless of what studies showing no link between in-person learning and spread of COVID. Not many states publicly have good antibody data, but in states that do such as Florida for example, kids under 14 were 17.9% positive for antibodies. I personally think the harm of them being away from school (especially those pre-middle school) is way worse than them getting/spreading COVID. I'm moreso just saying even if kids are way less efficient at spreading the virus and don't typically get sick, I'm not 100% convinced they don't contribute to the spread how we've been led to believe just because it is hard to trace the mass amounts of asymptomatics that are clearly coming in these age groups.

                              I guess those positive for the antibodies may not have picked it up in school or even transmitted in school, but that is an awfully high number for seroprevalence.
                              That's a reasonable assessment. But I can tell you empirically in my office we aren't see positive cases from in school exposure, like zero I can recall right now. We are seeing it when parents are positive in the same household or from sports or other outside of school close contacts. Also there are very few preteen and younger kids that are the index case for household transmission. Teenagers are a different story.

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                              • Originally posted by InKellyWeTrust View Post
                                That's a reasonable assessment. But I can tell you empirically in my office we aren't see positive cases from in school exposure, like zero I can recall right now. We are seeing it when parents are positive in the same household or from sports or other outside of school close contacts. Also there are very few preteen and younger kids that are the index case for household transmission. Teenagers are a different story.
                                Appreciate the feedback. Can look at COVID data all day and it doesn’t compare to first hand experiences like yours.

                                Comment


                                • Originally posted by InKellyWeTrust View Post
                                  Transmission within schools isn't the problem, especially K-8. In general, schools are doing a phenomenal job. Outside of school activities are where this is spreading amongst the pediatric population. I don't have the time to link sources but you can find them if you look.
                                  Originally posted by notredomer23 View Post
                                  I am not convinced kids in school aren't partially behind the spread regardless of what studies showing no link between in-person learning and spread of COVID. Not many states publicly have good antibody data, but in states that do such as Florida for example, kids under 14 were 17.9% positive for antibodies. I personally think the harm of them being away from school (especially those pre-middle school) is way worse than them getting/spreading COVID. I'm moreso just saying even if kids are way less efficient at spreading the virus and don't typically get sick, I'm not 100% convinced they don't contribute to the spread how we've been led to believe just because it is hard to trace the mass amounts of asymptomatics that are clearly coming in these age groups.

                                  I guess those positive for the antibodies may not have picked it up in school or even transmitted in school, but that is an awfully high number for seroprevalence. Edit: See IKWT just said that in the post above mine about it not being transmitted in school but in other activities.
                                  Originally posted by InKellyWeTrust View Post
                                  That's a reasonable assessment. But I can tell you empirically in my office we aren't see positive cases from in school exposure, like zero I can recall right now. We are seeing it when parents are positive in the same household or from sports or other outside of school close contacts. Also there are very few preteen and younger kids that are the index case for household transmission. Teenagers are a different story.
                                  I haven't kept up with the recent studies, but one of the initial theories regarding kids and CoV is that because children typically have less expression of ACE2 sites, they don't get CoV as easy as an adult would. I'm not sure if I said that technically as accurate as can be, but it's close enough. Anyway, with that thought in mind, it is very likely that children could be vectors of SARS-CoV-2 without getting infected. Think of a mosquito and malaria. Thus, when going through the tracing process, they'd never pop up as the index case... their parent/relative would.

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                                  • Originally posted by NDBoiler View Post
                                    Havenít a good amount of schools already figured out how to make it work with proper precautions and been going back to school at least in some form? Here in the Indy area, my one son in high school has been going to school this school year in person on an every other day schedule (they basically split the school in half, where half the kids go in person one day, while the other half Zooms), and my younger one In grade school has been in person full time since the beginning of the school year. Iíd be interested to know what this looks like across the country percentage wise, but I just donít see this as some ground breaking idea that a lot of schools havenít already figured out how to adapt and overcome a while back.
                                    My granddaughter goes to Franklin Central and they've been on an altering schedule like you described. I've not heard any reports of outbreaks.

                                    Comment


                                    • Nationwide, new case levels are at their lowest rate since the first week of December (7-day moving average). On top of naturally declining rates, we are closing in on an inoculation rate of 1M/day. I expect the daily new case rate to decline 90%+ by May 1st.

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                                      • Originally posted by IrishLax View Post
                                        Nationwide, new case levels are at their lowest rate since the first week of December (7-day moving average). On top of naturally declining rates, we are closing in on an inoculation rate of 1M/day. I expect the daily new case rate to decline 90%+ by May 1st.
                                        Governors not named Desantis are going to have some tough decisions about 100% (or close to it) reopening when those 65+ and with comorbidities are mostly vaccinated. It's 100% or as close to that at preventing severe illness. These people no longer have to fear. I get we are a couple months away from that, but it's coming. If people aren't getting hospitalized, we can't wait for the Fall for normality as Fauci has said. The economy especially the hospitality industry can't miss out on another summer.

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                                        • Can someone with knowledge chime in on this:

                                          The vaccine trials didn't specifically test for transmission or infection; they simply tested to see a reduction in severity of symptoms? Is that generally correct? However, I've been told (and have seen it in writing as well) that historically, vaccines block infection and transmission as well so it should be pretty safe to assume Pfizer and Moderna vaccinations are not only reducing severity in cases, but also preventing infection for the most part (reducing viral load to a manageable rate) and also blocking transmission. Thoughts on this?

                                          Comment


                                          • Originally posted by NDBoiler View Post
                                            Havenít a good amount of schools already figured out how to make it work with proper precautions and been going back to school at least in some form? Here in the Indy area, my one son in high school has been going to school this school year in person on an every other day schedule (they basically split the school in half, where half the kids go in person one day, while the other half Zooms), and my younger one In grade school has been in person full time since the beginning of the school year. Iíd be interested to know what this looks like across the country percentage wise, but I just donít see this as some ground breaking idea that a lot of schools havenít already figured out how to adapt and overcome a while back.
                                            Originally posted by Irish#1 View Post
                                            My granddaughter goes to Franklin Central and they've been on an altering schedule like you described. I've not heard any reports of outbreaks.
                                            We're in the Carmel school district. K-8 cases weren't bad at all during the fall semester. High school had a fare share, but not enough to shut it all down. My kids are in daycare so I'm not in tune with all the specifics, but I think elementary schools were in-person 100% of the week while middle school and high school aged kids did the hybrid system. It seemed to work well. I think the biggest complaint I heard was that the elementary schools weren't hybrid as well. They should've been, because as teachers came down with symptoms, there was a brief shortage and it was stressful for them.

                                            Originally posted by notredomer23 View Post
                                            Governors not named Desantis are going to have some tough decisions about 100% (or close to it) reopening when those 65+ and with comorbidities are mostly vaccinated. It's 100% or as close to that at preventing severe illness. These people no longer have to fear. I get we are a couple months away from that, but it's coming. If people aren't getting hospitalized, we can't wait for the Fall for normality as Fauci has said. The economy especially the hospitality industry can't miss out on another summer.
                                            I had this conversation the other day with a friend. At what point (if ever) will people open things back up and shoot to return to normal? I've been vaccinated (2nd shot) for over two weeks. If it's true regarding transmission, I'd prefer to just get back to normal living. No mask, dining out, hit the gym, etc without fear of getting infected or becoming an asymptomatic carrier. I can't be alone in that thought process. Once more and more people are vaccinated, they'll want their lives back sooner rather than later.

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                                            • A couple of stories reported to me.

                                              Sometimes the vaccination areas have extra doses. Then for those who do not yet have scheduled appointments, the software identifies others to notify through their cell phone. But they must be able to show up within one hour. Doses are discarded if not used.

                                              Two cases:
                                              A mother who had a severly disabled adult child got him and his equipment including wheelchair into the car. After he was inoculated, she was asked if she wanted a dose. "If there's not someone more in need of it than me." She is his primary caregiver and her loss would impact him.

                                              A homeless woman who was unable to get to the central vaccination site on previous notifications and turned them down could get the site this time. She had a burner phone. The homeless often don't have places to keep their meds or have them stolen, so their chronic conditions are not under control. All have to register via phone filling out appropriate info assessing their status.

                                              Comment


                                              • Originally posted by Legacy View Post
                                                A couple of stories reported to me.

                                                Sometimes the vaccination areas have extra doses. Then for those who do not yet have scheduled appointments, the software identifies others to notify through their cell phone. But they must be able to show up within one hour. Doses are discarded if not used.

                                                Two cases:
                                                A mother who had a severly disabled adult child got him and his equipment including wheelchair into the car. After he was inoculated, she was asked if she wanted a dose. "If there's not someone more in need of it than me." She is his primary caregiver and her loss would impact him.

                                                A homeless woman who was unable to get to the central vaccination site on previous notifications and turned them down could get the site this time. She had a burner phone. The homeless often don't have places to keep their meds or have them stolen, so their chronic conditions are not under control. All have to register via phone filling out appropriate info assessing their status.
                                                Can confirm that to be the case where I live. Two friends have gone that route. One was given 30 minutes to show up (she used it to get her mom vaccinated). The other volunteers (which is supposed to count as someone who is eligible, but they don't have enough...so they say)...they put her on standby every day. Last night, she got her first dose after someone cancelled last minute and they couldn't let it go to waste.

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                                                • This is a good read. Talks about the CDC's foul ups in the early days of COVID, beyond any possible interference by the WH.

                                                  <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Critics have said the CDC fumbled key decisions on COVID because the Trump administration meddled in the agency’s operations. But <a href="https://twitter.com/Reuters?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Reuters</a> has found evidence that the response was marred by actions – or inaction – by career scientists and frontline staff <a href="https://t.co/QIxlJ8IxR4">https://t.co/QIxlJ8IxR4</a></p>&mdash; Reuters (@Reuters) <a href="https://twitter.com/Reuters/status/1352722952224124929?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 22, 2021</a></blockquote> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

                                                  TL:DR - There's a lot of other blunders detailed, but an infectious disease specialist suggested testing asymptomatic people that first came over from Wuhan, but the CDC denied the request. It was almost 3 months later before the CDC expanded their guidelines to include asymptomatic individuals.

                                                  Comment


                                                  • Originally posted by BleedBlueGold View Post
                                                    Can someone with knowledge chime in on this:

                                                    The vaccine trials didn't specifically test for transmission or infection; they simply tested to see a reduction in severity of symptoms? Is that generally correct? However, I've been told (and have seen it in writing as well) that historically, vaccines block infection and transmission as well so it should be pretty safe to assume Pfizer and Moderna vaccinations are not only reducing severity in cases, but also preventing infection for the most part (reducing viral load to a manageable rate) and also blocking transmission. Thoughts on this?
                                                    I cannot chime on on your specific request but anecdotally I can tell you that there are also monoclonal antibodies currently in Phase III testing that have reported good results. Specifically, companies are using monoclonal antibodies to prevent infection. Lilly just reported Phase III results studying their MAB in nursing home settings w/ an 80% success rate. My wife just entered a similar study with another company. The MAB are IM as well. My guess is they’d be far more expensive than vaccines which are historically not expensive compared to other pharmacological agents. MABs have become standard of care in many tumor types in cancer as well as auto-immune treatments for RA, Crone’s, psoriatic arthritis, MS, etc.

                                                    Comment


                                                    • Got mine (finally) this morning. Been a little bit of hit and miss here in WNY. Not placing blame, but it’s frustrating for those that want it. I got Moderna early today. No side effect whatsoever. I barely felt the needle and without being reminded, it’s hard to recall doing it. No soreness or effects yet. Hopefully it remains this way. I’m trying to fill spots last minute through our agency. So far, we’ve been able to use any and all extra doses that have become available. The lack of coordination and organization is frustrating. Getting in touch with people working and off is a challenge immediately and some didn’t give full consideration because they had no idea they would be given an opportunity. I like to research these types of things, so I understand the pause. The good thing is some that initially declined have decided to now get it.

                                                      We’ve had a mini outbreak at my place of work. The guys/gals need permission to even come down my hallway.

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                                                      • Got my first moderna shot yesterday afternoon. A little sore at injection site but no other side effects to report. Iím sure Iíll figure out what to do with this third nipple that appeared overnight

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                                                        • I'm jealous. You have to be 80 and over to get the vaccine in Ohio right now.

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                                                          • I'm eligible now in Virginia because I'm a "private school employee" because of coaching. Unfortunately, all of the appointment slots they're offering are second dose only! There are literally no "first doses" being offered through the second week of February, and they don't have any listings past that. I'll be refreshing it daily until I can find a spot.

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                                                            • Originally posted by BleedBlueGold View Post
                                                              Can someone with knowledge chime in on this:

                                                              The vaccine trials didn't specifically test for transmission or infection; they simply tested to see a reduction in severity of symptoms? Is that generally correct? However, I've been told (and have seen it in writing as well) that historically, vaccines block infection and transmission as well so it should be pretty safe to assume Pfizer and Moderna vaccinations are not only reducing severity in cases, but also preventing infection for the most part (reducing viral load to a manageable rate) and also blocking transmission. Thoughts on this?
                                                              The traditional kinds of vaccines are:
                                                              Inactivated and Live Attenuated Vaccines. Most vaccines in use today incorporate an inactivated or weakened form of a virus that is not able to cause disease. When immune cells encounter them, they make antibodies. Conventional vaccines for influenza, chickenpox, measles, mumps and rubella all fall into this category. The limitations with the flu vaccine is that it depends on anticipating the type of flu virus that may be dominant in the U.S. and that it requires growing in a medium, lots of it. Multiple strains of influenza usually circulate and protection is against the one strain.

                                                              DNA Vaccines deliver genetic instructions for building a viral protein. The protein can then stimulate the immune system to make antibodies and help mount other defenses against the coronavirus. DNA vaccines work by injecting genetically engineered plasmid containing the DNA sequence encoding the antigen(s) against which an immune response is sought, so the cells directly produce the antigen, thus causing a protective immunological response.

                                                              The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are messenger RNA vaccines which skip DNA and instead deliver messenger RNA into cells. The cells read the mRNA and make spike proteins that provoke an immune response.

                                                              All rely on triggering an immune response once the body detects the virus. They tested to see which group between those that got the vaccine and those that did not got the infection (efficacy), which was 90-95% effective in preventing Covid-19 disease based on symptoms.
                                                              To my knowledge they did not test to see if the one vaccinated individual out of 40,000 who did develop the disease from the SARS-CoV-2 virus could transmit it.

                                                              This outlines how that study might proceed.
                                                              Vaccines stop COVID-19 symptoms, but do they stop transmission?


                                                              The team’s proposed study would go like this: In the controlled environment of a human challenge trial, about 50 young adult volunteers would receive a vaccine, and the same number would get a placebo. Then, all the participants would be deliberately infected with a strain of the COVID-19 virus. Only young volunteers would be recruited for the study, because they are most likely to come down with just a mild case of COVID-19.

                                                              Isolated in a safe location for two weeks, participants would get regular swabs for a test that not only detects virus but can measure how much of it — the viral load — is in their specimens. The higher the viral load, the more likely a person is likely to transmit the virus to others.
                                                              There are ethical considerations here in deliberately infecting volunteers without knowing the impact and whether a vaccine along these lines was effective in young adults would have the same efficacy in older adults.
                                                              Last edited by Legacy; 01-23-2021, 02:37 PM.

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                                                              • Originally posted by irishtrooper View Post
                                                                Got mine (finally) this morning. Been a little bit of hit and miss here in WNY. Not placing blame, but itís frustrating for those that want it. I got Moderna early today. No side effect whatsoever. I barely felt the needle and without being reminded, itís hard to recall doing it. No soreness or effects yet. Hopefully it remains this way. Iím trying to fill spots last minute through our agency. So far, weíve been able to use any and all extra doses that have become available. The lack of coordination and organization is frustrating. Getting in touch with people working and off is a challenge immediately and some didnít give full consideration because they had no idea they would be given an opportunity. I like to research these types of things, so I understand the pause. The good thing is some that initially declined have decided to now get it.

                                                                Weíve had a mini outbreak at my place of work. The guys/gals need permission to even come down my hallway.
                                                                I heard that employees at my customer in Lakewood, NY were actually trying to get COVID for the paid time off.

                                                                Btw, not to get off topic too much - The Ashville General Store by you has some of the best food that Iíve had. Their pizza and chicken wings are fantastic - just ordered a couple pies for my team last week. I eat there just about everyday when in town. You should check it out if you havenít already.

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                                                                • Originally posted by BleedBlueGold View Post
                                                                  Can someone with knowledge chime in on this:

                                                                  The vaccine trials didn't specifically test for transmission or infection; they simply tested to see a reduction in severity of symptoms? Is that generally correct? However, I've been told (and have seen it in writing as well) that historically, vaccines block infection and transmission as well so it should be pretty safe to assume Pfizer and Moderna vaccinations are not only reducing severity in cases, but also preventing infection for the most part (reducing viral load to a manageable rate) and also blocking transmission. Thoughts on this?
                                                                  Vaccines do not block the transmission, they help your body recover through a more rapid response. Please, PLEASE, get this information out: you can still carry and transmit SARS-CoV-2, even after you are vaccinated. You can also still get infected, but the severity of the infection should be less. Keep your masks on, and keep your distancing going for one month after you get your second shot. I believe the antibodies don't fully kick in until 3-4 weeks after the second shot.

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                                                                  • Got my second Pfizer shot, yesterday. About 2 hours after taking the shot, I had a sudden wave of fatigue hit me. Since that time, I've just felt a slight malaise. No fever, no chills, just... "blah."

                                                                    I worked out last night, probably a little more than I should have, and after I was done I swear I was ready to drop. Drank some Gatorade and ate a meal-replacement bar, then eventually went to sleep. Woke up slightly dizzy, ate some breakfast, and now I'm just observing my vitals and chilling on the couch.

                                                                    I'm used to muscle pain, so the shoulder feels okay. I know others have had more severe reactions, but I think all are resolved within 24 hours. In any case, I'd rather have some reaction that none.

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                                                                    • Originally posted by SonofOahu View Post
                                                                      Got my second Pfizer shot, yesterday. About 2 hours after taking the shot, I had a sudden wave of fatigue hit me. Since that time, I've just felt a slight malaise. No fever, no chills, just... "blah."

                                                                      I worked out last night, probably a little more than I should have, and after I was done I swear I was ready to drop. Drank some Gatorade and ate a meal-replacement bar, then eventually went to sleep. Woke up slightly dizzy, ate some breakfast, and now I'm just observing my vitals and chilling on the couch.

                                                                      I'm used to muscle pain, so the shoulder feels okay. I know others have had more severe reactions, but I think all are resolved within 24 hours. In any case, I'd rather have some reaction that none.
                                                                      My buddy said the fatigue and weird lazy feeling lasted about 3 days for him
                                                                      Based Mullet Kid owns

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                                                                      • Originally posted by NorthDakota View Post
                                                                        My buddy said the fatigue and weird lazy feeling lasted about 3 days for him
                                                                        Thatís the weed talking.

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                                                                        • Originally posted by Irish2155 View Post
                                                                          I heard that employees at my customer in Lakewood, NY were actually trying to get COVID for the paid time off.

                                                                          Btw, not to get off topic too much - The Ashville General Store by you has some of the best food that Iíve had. Their pizza and chicken wings are fantastic - just ordered a couple pies for my team last week. I eat there just about everyday when in town. You should check it out if you havenít already.

                                                                          They make a great Cuban sub. All their food is great. Their pizza crust is very good, but the sauce isnít my favorite. I live 5 minutes from there. They are in the takeout rotation for sure.

                                                                          The time off thing is a thing. On my job, you can get ďfreeĒ leave if you get contact traced by a county health dept OR with a positive test result. If you call in sick, end up getting tested and test positive-youíll get retro credited leave and the quarantine is now 10 days here. If you have contact but no positive test (or mandatory quarantine) you are to report w/mask at all times and maintain social distance. That was changed due to abuse I believe. What business in Lakewood do you work with? That town is literally right by my place

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                                                                          • Originally posted by Irish2155 View Post
                                                                            I heard that employees at my customer in Lakewood, NY were actually trying to get COVID for the paid time off.

                                                                            Btw, not to get off topic too much - The Ashville General Store by you has some of the best food that Iíve had. Their pizza and chicken wings are fantastic - just ordered a couple pies for my team last week. I eat there just about everyday when in town. You should check it out if you havenít already.
                                                                            That's dumb. I had fever of over 101.5 for 8 days. It's not worth it.

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                                                                            • Originally posted by irishtrooper View Post
                                                                              They make a great Cuban sub. All their food is great. Their pizza crust is very good, but the sauce isnít my favorite. I live 5 minutes from there. They are in the takeout rotation for sure.

                                                                              The time off thing is a thing. On my job, you can get ďfreeĒ leave if you get contact traced by a county health dept OR with a positive test result. If you call in sick, end up getting tested and test positive-youíll get retro credited leave and the quarantine is now 10 days here. If you have contact but no positive test (or mandatory quarantine) you are to report w/mask at all times and maintain social distance. That was changed due to abuse I believe. What business in Lakewood do you work with? That town is literally right by my place
                                                                              Yeah, Iíve had their Cuban as well...very good. Itís close to the plant too so I usually do lunch there every day when in town. My team teases me about it lol.

                                                                              I work with Cummins nationally and Jamestown is one of my larger sites. The COVID related absenteeism is out of control as you note people are taking advantage of the paid leave policy. Which is good for me as we do their contingent labor staffing. I have about 100 employees there currently with 100+ job openings still to fill if you know anyone interested. You might have seen some of our advertising lately in the market. I think we have our video ad running on Facebook over the weekend.

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                                                                              • That’s funny, I know the plant boss (female initials AD) quite well. Her husband works with me. Their daughters played hoops with/against my daughters..... Small world and all. I live near I86 and I grew up near there as well. We recently had a guy retire here and his son just started at the plant. The issue is they have to go through the temp agency and do it for 90 days to get picked up full time (at least that’s what I am told). I recommend hitting up Pine Junction if you have the time. Probably a 20 minute drive, but it’s an awesome atmosphere. Good drinks and food. Owner is a good guy. Also, Lakewood Rod N Gun is good. Just a couple minutes from the plant (AD’s husband is a member) if you’re close. If not, look me up when you’re in town if you want.

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                                                                                • Thanks for the suggestion. I’ve been to Jamestown like maybe 100 times but not since COVID. The girls at the Hampton Inn know me by name. About three years ago I was up there about every other week when I was short staffed. I’ll let you know when I make my next trip and watch out for all those deer.

                                                                                  I know AD well...I meet with her and other Leadership at least quarterly. She’s a very nice person and treats my team really good. One of our offices is a couple down from her’s in the HR department. She stops in to chat with my team often. I see her in Columbus, IN some times too...Cummins has a jet that she uses. Actually, the guy who used to work for me there either is or was AD’s neighbor. You might know him too.

                                                                                  Yeah, so that guy who just started works for me. We are that temp agency and I run my operation from within their walls. We just gave him a $2 pay raise and my team emailed him a Cummins job application for full time on Friday. They’re about to hire about 30 or so of my folks, so best of luck to him.
                                                                                  Last edited by Irish2155; 01-23-2021, 06:50 PM.

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                                                                                  • Originally posted by Irish2155 View Post
                                                                                    Thanks for the suggestion. Iíve been to Jamestown like maybe 100 times but not since COVID. The girls at the Hampton Inn know me by name. About three years ago I was up there about every other week when I was short staffed. Iíll let you know when I make my next trip and watch out for all those deer.

                                                                                    I know AD well...I meet with her and other Leadership at least quarterly. Sheís a very nice person and treats my team really good. One of our offices is a couple down from herís in the HR department. She stops in to chat with my team often. I see her in Columbus, IN some times too...Cummins has a jet that she uses. Actually, the guy who used to work for me there either is or was ADís neighbor. You might know him too.

                                                                                    Yeah, so that guy who just started works for me. We are that temp agency and I run my operation from within their walls. We just gave him a $2 pay raise and my team emailed him a Cummins job application for full time on Friday. Theyíre about to hire about 30 or so of my folks, so best of luck to him.

                                                                                    Funny how you things work sometimes. If youíre into giant cinnamon rolls, check out the Bemus Pt Inn (15 minutes away). My wife insures them. Awesome people. The Dutch Village in Clymer (15 minutes) has the BEST homemade bread (if you eat there I strongly suggest the glazed French toast). They serve breakfast all day. Itís not even fair how good it is. I will look forward to hearing from you

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                                                                                    • Total hospitalizations have decreased by 15% since they peaked at 132,470 on January 6th, down to 113,609 yesterday.

                                                                                      7 day case average peaked on January 11th at 254K. As of yesterday, the 7 day average was 179,707, a 29% decrease.

                                                                                      According to Bloomberg, hospitalizations are decreasing in every single state with the exception of New York, and even there they appear to be stabilizing.

                                                                                      More than 21 million vaccines have been administered, averaging over 1MM shots/day already. JNJ approval to come in the next couple weeks should be the shot that ends the pandemic.

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                                                                                      • https://twitter.com/atrupar/status/1...461426176?s=21
                                                                                        Not sure if I believe her but if true:
                                                                                        1. What a lack of spine
                                                                                        2. How fucked up was this admin that this shit was allowed to occur.

                                                                                        Does everyone remember when the CDC was removed from handling data?
                                                                                        Last edited by Cackalacky2.0; 01-24-2021, 10:30 AM.
                                                                                        "From Chaos comes Clarity"

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                                                                                        • Self over Duty, Truth and Country .

                                                                                          Someone should turn a snappier version of that into the Motto of the last four years.

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                                                                                          • Originally posted by notredomer23 View Post
                                                                                            Total hospitalizations have decreased by 15% since they peaked at 132,470 on January 6th, down to 113,609 yesterday.

                                                                                            7 day case average peaked on January 11th at 254K. As of yesterday, the 7 day average was 179,707, a 29% decrease.

                                                                                            According to Bloomberg, hospitalizations are decreasing in every single state with the exception of New York, and even there they appear to be stabilizing.

                                                                                            More than 21 million vaccines have been administered, averaging over 1MM shots/day already. JNJ approval to come in the next couple weeks should be the shot that ends the pandemic.
                                                                                            CNN first started reporting the decreasing numbers on 1/20/21. Biden effect.

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                                                                                            • <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Fauci unchained:<br>&quot;They knew where my kids work, where they live. The threats would come directly to my children’s phones, directly to my children’s homes. How the hell did whoever these assholes were get that information?&quot;<a href="https://t.co/Hu927Be1nV">https://t.co/Hu927Be1nV</a></p>&mdash; Christopher Mele (@MeleChristopher) <a href="https://twitter.com/MeleChristopher/status/1353416519825444864?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 24, 2021</a></blockquote> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
                                                                                              What did Davonte do?

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                                                                                              • Originally posted by dublinirish View Post
                                                                                                <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Fauci unchained:<br>&quot;They knew where my kids work, where they live. The threats would come directly to my childrenís phones, directly to my childrenís homes. How the hell did whoever these assholes were get that information?&quot;<a href="https://t.co/Hu927Be1nV">https://t.co/Hu927Be1nV</a></p>&mdash; Christopher Mele (@MeleChristopher) <a href="https://twitter.com/MeleChristopher/status/1353416519825444864?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 24, 2021</a></blockquote> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
                                                                                                That's awful. I have no idea what possesses people to be that bad.
                                                                                                Based Mullet Kid owns

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                                                                                                • Cool graph to map out the per capita vaccinations - https://ourworldindata.org/covid-vaccinations

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                                                                                                  • I'm not trying to be a jerk or start political warfare discussion, but what are the chances that we see a similar response to last late winter/spring with this new strand starting to spike and with a new administration and possible way of doing things??
                                                                                                    Love You JB 64.....RIP.....AI720....4EVER

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                                                                                                    • Originally posted by rtrn2glory View Post
                                                                                                      I'm not trying to be a jerk or start political warfare discussion, but what are the chances that we see a similar response to last late winter/spring with this new strand starting to spike and with a new administration and possible way of doing things??
                                                                                                      No warfare will be needed. If you listen to Birx and Faucci now, the covid response under Trump was highly politicized, anti science and pushed false data into the public. They downplayed it at every turn, undermined the science and scientists and did everything their power to make sure the response was as tepid and ineffective as possible.

                                                                                                      Literally a 5th grader with a working knowledge of how washing your hands to prevent spread of diseases will do better.
                                                                                                      "From Chaos comes Clarity"

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