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  • Irish#1
    replied
    Originally posted by Wild Bill View Post

    Yeah I think it's fine with traditional vents but take a look at those registers in the link. They restrict flow a bit. Just not sure how much.
    I looked at the specs. I’m obviously not a HVAC guy but if you’re not putting in a new blower for more CFM I can’t see these causing a problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wild Bill
    replied
    Originally posted by Irish#1 View Post

    The old home (1883) we are renovating has a lot flex duct with a 10X4 on the end. We replaced the furnace in the upgrade but left the flex and 10X4. We’ve not noticed any issues with air restriction and our HVAC guy who I’ve known for a long time wasn’t concerned.
    Yeah I think it's fine with traditional vents but take a look at those registers in the link. They restrict flow a bit. Just not sure how much.

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Originally posted by Wild Bill View Post
    Any HVAC guys on the board? I'm renovating a house and the upstairs has flexible ducts with round 6 inch dampers that are just hideous. I want to replace them with a 10x4 register box and then attach flush mount air registers in the link below.

    My concern/question is whether or not this will restrict airflow to an extent that would be problematic. I have done some research but it's hard to get a straight answer and my HVAC guy doesn't even know what the hell these are. Bet if I put them in a case of beer he'd know.

    https://ariavent.com/collections/ven...oaAng9EALw_wcB
    The old home (1883) we are renovating has a lot flex duct with a 10X4 on the end. We replaced the furnace in the upgrade but left the flex and 10X4. We’ve not noticed any issues with air restriction and our HVAC guy who I’ve known for a long time wasn’t concerned.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wild Bill
    replied
    Any HVAC guys on the board? I'm renovating a house and the upstairs has flexible ducts with round 6 inch dampers that are just hideous. I want to replace them with a 10x4 register box and then attach flush mount air registers in the link below.

    My concern/question is whether or not this will restrict airflow to an extent that would be problematic. I have done some research but it's hard to get a straight answer and my HVAC guy doesn't even know what the hell these are. Bet if I put them in a case of beer he'd know.

    https://ariavent.com/collections/ven...oaAng9EALw_wcB

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    The wife decided she wants to put a ceiling fan in the pavillion and hang a couple of barn lights. I get estimates and hire an electrician. I tell her ahead of time that there will be some exposed flex conduit and she says that's okay as long as they try to hide most of it. Electrician comes out and does a great job. The wife comes out, takes a look and is upset because you can see the flex extending down to the lights.

    Wife: "If I'd known it would look like that I wouldn't have had them do it!".
    Me: I did tell you ahead of time there would be exposed wiring."
    Wife: "But I didn't think it would look like that! and I don't like the spacing of the lights"
    Me: "The lights are exactly where you wanted them."

    I ended up building these boxes to cover the wiring. She's a happy camper now.

    Leave a comment:


  • NDBoiler
    replied
    Originally posted by Irish#1 View Post
    The limestone caps finally came in. Need to spray off the dirt, but I'm happy with the results.

    Not too bad for an old guy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Originally posted by Irish#1 View Post
    Well, here it is minus the cap to go on top. I have a little mortar to clean off but overall I'm happy. Saved myself close to a thousand bucks. Mason's make it look so easy!

    The limestone caps finally came in. Need to spray off the dirt, but I'm happy with the results.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bluto
    replied
    Originally posted by NDdomer2 View Post
    Lol the breaker part was actually a pain in the ass. 1) I'm working in basement so had to go garage to basement after every breaker flip to see which was right one. 2) And of course the outlet I needed wasn't on an obvious breaker like the 3 different breakers the specifically mentioned basement in some fashion. Instead it was on the washer and dryer breaker (both are upstairs)

    We're all good now tho thanks for the help fellas
    For future electrical I’d recommend getting a circuit breaker finder with a receptacle tester. They run about $30.00. Eliminates having to flip circuits on and off.

    Leave a comment:


  • NDdomer2
    replied
    Originally posted by Irish#1 View Post
    Since you already have a box, I'd just use it. As Boiler said, you can mount it above or below the existing one or on the opposite side of the stud. Personally I would put it on the opposite side of the stud so the height is the same. That way you avoid any code violations if you sell and the inspector is a butthole. Remember when you mount, don't make it flush with the stud. There should be little tabs that show you how deep to set it. It goes without saying, but remember to flip the breaker before you start. We don't want to read about you in the RIP thread. lol
    Lol the breaker part was actually a pain in the ass. 1) I'm working in basement so had to go garage to basement after every breaker flip to see which was right one. 2) And of course the outlet I needed wasn't on an obvious breaker like the 3 different breakers the specifically mentioned basement in some fashion. Instead it was on the washer and dryer breaker (both are upstairs)

    We're all good now tho thanks for the help fellas

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Since you already have a box, I'd just use it. As Boiler said, you can mount it above or below the existing one or on the opposite side of the stud. Personally I would put it on the opposite side of the stud so the height is the same. That way you avoid any code violations if you sell and the inspector is a butthole. Remember when you mount, don't make it flush with the stud. There should be little tabs that show you how deep to set it. It goes without saying, but remember to flip the breaker before you start. We don't want to read about you in the RIP thread. lol

    Leave a comment:


  • NDdomer2
    replied
    Tried to rep ya Irish#1 but I must spread.

    I found a box in a closet so I think I just need to nail it in, u less it's just going to be easier to use the new work box like Boiler said.

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Originally posted by NDdomer2 View Post
    So i think this project should be relatively easy but I am no electrician by any means.

    I have an outlet in my basement and a storage area on the immediate other side of the wall which is unfinished. I want the outlet to be on both sides. I believe i can just install a different style outlet box that allows me to put one on both sides but just wanted to check here. See picture below.
    Not an electrician either, but I've never seen a box where you can install multiple outlets facing the opposite direction. Since boxes are designed to minimize the risk of fire, I am guessing they don't make what you want, but I could be wrong. If you're just wanting access to that outlet and won't be adding additional constant load to the breaker I would just install a second box facing the other way and jumper it off the first one.

    Edit: What Boiler said.

    Leave a comment:


  • NDdomer2
    replied
    Originally posted by NDBoiler View Post
    I would just pigtail out of the bottom of that existing box, drill a hole through the stud and pull wire into your new box on the other side of the stud facing into your unfinished space. Or you could go a little lower or higher with that new box on the same side of the stud. Also make the box for the unfinished side is a “new work” box, which has nails molded into it that you anchor to the stud, not “old work” or a “remodel” box which have plastic anchors that clamp to drywall.
    thanks - i was looking online and i couldnt find any sort of front/back boxes anyways.

    Leave a comment:


  • NDBoiler
    replied
    Originally posted by NDdomer2 View Post
    So i think this project should be relatively easy but I am no electrician by any means.

    I have an outlet in my basement and a storage area on the immediate other side of the wall which is unfinished. I want the outlet to be on both sides. I believe i can just install a different style outlet box that allows me to put one on both sides but just wanted to check here. See picture below.

    I would just pigtail out of the bottom of that existing box, drill a hole through the stud and pull wire into your new box on the other side of the stud facing into your unfinished space. Or you could go a little lower or higher with that new box on the same side of the stud. Also make the box for the unfinished side is a “new work” box, which has nails molded into it that you anchor to the stud, not “old work” or a “remodel” box which have plastic anchors that clamp to drywall.

    Leave a comment:


  • NDdomer2
    replied
    So i think this project should be relatively easy but I am no electrician by any means.

    I have an outlet in my basement and a storage area on the immediate other side of the wall which is unfinished. I want the outlet to be on both sides. I believe i can just install a different style outlet box that allows me to put one on both sides but just wanted to check here. See picture below.

    Leave a comment:


  • ab2cmiller
    replied
    Great job man!

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    The old house we're working on has a set of bi-fold garage doors. They were in bad shape with some rotting and general deterioration. Took them down, sanded them down cut out most of the bad and replaced with treated lumber. Used dowels and wood glue to attach. Since you can't see the back I also added a small piece across the back to act as a brace. The wife made a stencil and used some etching liquid to put the design in the glass. They turned out better than I anticipated.

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Originally posted by wizards8507 View Post
    I'm not crazy!

    I tracked down the HVAC guy who set up the current thermostats. There were two major remodels done in this house's history, one to finish a bonus room over the garage, and then a two-story extension that includes the kitchen on the first floor and the master bedroom on the second floor. The contractor who did one or the other of those projects messed up the wiring and the old zones terminate randomly in the walls somewhere that they've never been able to trace.
    Call Mike Holmes. He'll make it right.

    Leave a comment:


  • wizards8507
    replied
    I'm not crazy!

    I tracked down the HVAC guy who set up the current thermostats. There were two major remodels done in this house's history, one to finish a bonus room over the garage, and then a two-story extension that includes the kitchen on the first floor and the master bedroom on the second floor. The contractor who did one or the other of those projects messed up the wiring and the old zones terminate randomly in the walls somewhere that they've never been able to trace.

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Little grapevine project I helped the wife with. Didn't take long. Need to buy a few more bags of stone. I should have known to buy more than what she said was needed. She's a terrible estimator. lol

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Originally posted by wizards8507 View Post
    Okay so riddle me this. I still can't find the Zone 2 wires, but setting that aside for a second.

    I got out a wire tracer to confirm that what I believed to be the Zone 3 wires were, in fact, the Zone 3 wires. They were, except that on the thermostat end there are 5 wires in the cable but on the basement end there are only 3 wires in the cable.
    I'm assuming all five are not terminated on the other end? If so, they probably trimmed them on the other end as they weren't needed.

    Leave a comment:


  • wizards8507
    replied
    Okay so riddle me this. I still can't find the Zone 2 wires, but setting that aside for a second.

    I got out a wire tracer to confirm that what I believed to be the Zone 3 wires were, in fact, the Zone 3 wires. They were, except that on the thermostat end there are 5 wires in the cable but on the basement end there are only 3 wires in the cable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Valpodoc85
    replied
    Will be mounted near furnace or less likely next to the electrical service box. If the home is large there maybe two
    Can be mounted to the furnace

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    They have to be near the furnace.

    Leave a comment:


  • NDBoiler
    replied
    It’s like you tell your kids when they “look” for something Wiz. “Did you check everywhere? Did you move stuff around and look really good?” :)

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish YJ
    replied
    Originally posted by wizards8507 View Post
    HVAC puzzle.

    My house has a single air handler pushing air conditioning and forced hot air to three different zones controlled by duct dampers. We currently have a Nest thermostat installed in Zone 1 (downstairs) and two wireless thermostats installed in Zones 2 and 3, both upstairs.



    We want to replace the two upstairs thermostats with Nests as well. The good news is that there is thermostat wire already running behind the existing wireless thermostats, they're just not hooked up to anything. It seems fairly straightforward. Use the existing wire to connect the two new Nests directly to the zone control system, bypassing the wireless receiver entirely. Where I'm stumped is that I can't find the basement end of the damn thermostat wires. I can't figure out what the guy who installed the wireless thermostats did with them. Any suggestions?
    If you can't find where the them, suggest calling someone out to give an estimate lol. If the estimate is too high, he'll at least find endpoints for you :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • wizards8507
    replied
    HVAC puzzle.

    My house has a single air handler pushing air conditioning and forced hot air to three different zones controlled by duct dampers. We currently have a Nest thermostat installed in Zone 1 (downstairs) and two wireless thermostats installed in Zones 2 and 3, both upstairs.



    We want to replace the two upstairs thermostats with Nests as well. The good news is that there is thermostat wire already running behind the existing wireless thermostats, they're just not hooked up to anything. It seems fairly straightforward. Use the existing wire to connect the two new Nests directly to the zone control system, bypassing the wireless receiver entirely. Where I'm stumped is that I can't find the basement end of the damn thermostat wires. I can't figure out what the guy who installed the wireless thermostats did with them. Any suggestions?

    Leave a comment:


  • Wild Bill
    replied
    Originally posted by Irish#1 View Post
    Another electrical project. I have my thoughts on this, but want to hear what you guys think is the best way to approach this.

    We built a pavillion on our patio and I want to get power to it to install a ceiling fan and a couple of outlets for a TV. One of the corner polls sits just a couple of feet from the house. At that location I have a porch light and a GFC recepticle. I'm thinking my best option is to remove the light and add a surface box. Then I can put the light on the box and run a short piece of conduit out the top of the box over to the pavillion. This of course assumes I won't overload the breaker and don't need to add a toally new circuit.
    Ceilings fans are relatively energy efficient and if you're running LED lights off of the same line, I doubt you'd overload the breaker.

    Your idea makes sense, imo.

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Another electrical project. I have my thoughts on this, but want to hear what you guys think is the best way to approach this.

    We built a pavillion on our patio and I want to get power to it to install a ceiling fan and a couple of outlets for a TV. One of the corner polls sits just a couple of feet from the house. At that location I have a porch light and a GFC recepticle. I'm thinking my best option is to remove the light and add a surface box. Then I can put the light on the box and run a short piece of conduit out the top of the box over to the pavillion. This of course assumes I won't overload the breaker and don't need to add a toally new circuit.

    Leave a comment:


  • wizards8507
    replied
    Originally posted by ab2cmiller View Post
    I did all the electrical when we finished the basement in our house. I bought books, googled the crap out of everything, was meticulous in making sure that every little rule was followed.

    Inspector comes in and spends about 3 minutes glancing around and approved me. I was like ..... WTF ..... aren't you going to look and make sure that every wire is secured within 12 inches of each box. Learned that I spent probably twice as much time doing the project as I probably could've.
    I chewed up my skin being so vigorous with the screwdriver that I can no longer use my fingerprint to unlock my phone.

    Leave a comment:


  • ab2cmiller
    replied
    I did all the electrical when we finished the basement in our house. I bought books, googled the crap out of everything, was meticulous in making sure that every little rule was followed.

    Inspector comes in and spends about 3 minutes glancing around and approved me. I was like ..... WTF ..... aren't you going to look and make sure that every wire is secured within 12 inches of each box. Learned that I spent probably twice as much time doing the project as I probably could've.

    Leave a comment:


  • wizards8507
    replied
    Originally posted by Wild Bill View Post
    Ahhh, sorry. You probably crossed the line and connected the switch leg with the hot wire. Common mistake b/c the hot wire and switch legs are often both black. Track the lines and once you figure it out, wrap a piece of electric tape on the end of the switch legs about an inch away from the copper so you'll know it's a switch leg going forward.

    Disconnect the switch leg from the hot line and tie it in with the other switch leg and connect it to the switch. Should be good to go.

    Solid advice if you're ever messing with an old box with several wires. It's so easy to confuse lines.

    Goes without saying but take your time when you are doing electric. It's always easier to slow down and get it done right than it is to trace lines to correct a mistake. And a little patience will probably save you from riding the lightning too.
    I figured it out. The switch had two different ways to attach wires, the kind where you insert the wire straight into the back of the switch and the kind where you screw it onto the side. I had the hot wire connected to the top back (correct), one of the lights connected to the bottom back (correct), and the second light connected to the top side (incorrect, I believe this made it a "traveler"). I moved that wire down to the bottom side terminal and everything works properly.

    The two different types of terminals made tying the two legs together unnecessary, which is good because this was in a three-gang box with a dimmer and there wasn't room for any extra nuts.

    I replaced about 50 outlets in the last two weeks so I've got those down, but I'm just getting around to the switches.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wild Bill
    replied
    Originally posted by Irish#1 View Post
    He said the light is on all the time, so he's getting juice.
    Ahhh, sorry. You probably crossed the line and connected the switch leg with the hot wire. Common mistake b/c the hot wire and switch legs are often both black. Track the lines and once you figure it out, wrap a piece of electric tape on the end of the switch legs about an inch away from the copper so you'll know it's a switch leg going forward.

    Disconnect the switch leg from the hot line and tie it in with the other switch leg and connect it to the switch. Should be good to go.

    Originally posted by RDU Irish View Post
    Did you take a pic before disconnecting the old switch?
    Solid advice if you're ever messing with an old box with several wires. It's so easy to confuse lines.

    Goes without saying but take your time when you are doing electric. It's always easier to slow down and get it done right than it is to trace lines to correct a mistake. And a little patience will probably save you from riding the lightning too.
    Last edited by Wild Bill ; 05-18-2020, 11:42 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wild Bill
    replied
    I have about 178 projects going at the house right now. The main one is re-finishing a utility room that's about 500 square feet. So far, I've painted/sealed the cinder block walls, resurfaced my floors, built miles of of shelving for all my wife's "stuff" and enclosed the shelving off by building a wall to separate it from the rest of the utility room.

    I've been doing most of it with left over material to keep the costs down. The biggest issue was the floor. It's just a slab that was in terrible shape and it was pitched towards a drain so my options were limited. I got an estimate for epoxy - $2500 bucks. No chance. I picked up some epoxy from Sherwin Williams and did it myself. Application of the epoxy was incredibly easy but the prep work is was a little bit of a pain in the ass. I got all the material on sale, I think it was 30% off, and paid about $500 total.

    Looks decent and more durable than I thought so far. I'd recommend it. I'm thinking about doing my garage with the same stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Originally posted by Wild Bill View Post
    If one light is working it means the switch is fine and the hot wire is connected.

    I assume you checked the light bulbs. It's possible the fixture may have an issue or that you pulled the connection loose when you changed the switch but probably not likely.

    I would start by checking the switch leg connection. Sometimes people make this type of connection by connecting both switch legs directly to the switch and other times they tie the wires together with a pigtail and that pigtail is connected to the switch. I'm not sure how yours was wired but that's probably your issue.

    If you have them connected with a nut and pigtail, check to make sure the connection is solid. Pull the wire nut to see if its loose. If not, unscrew it and make sure the line is connected properly. Sometimes one line slips out and prevents a connection or the tip of a line cracks off, etc. Get everything good to go, tie them back up, put the nut back on and make sure the open end of the nut is facing down when you pack it into the box so it doesn't collect dust. You can tape the bottom too. Not a bad idea. You can run some tape around the switch once you get it working too.

    If you have both lines connected to the switch, I would put them on a pigtail - same as above.

    While you're in there with the power off, you may want to check your connection on the neutral line and the ground.

    If you're still not getting heat to that light, check the connection in the fixture or the bulbs if you haven't done so already.
    He said the light is on all the time, so he's getting juice.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wild Bill
    replied
    Originally posted by wizards8507 View Post
    Anybody good with electrical?

    I've been replacing light switches and I screwed something up. A single switch controls two lights on the front of the house. The switch works properly for one of the lights, but the other light is stuck on. What am I looking for?
    If one light is working it means the switch is fine and the hot wire is connected.

    I assume you checked the light bulbs. It's possible the fixture may have an issue or that you pulled the connection loose when you changed the switch but probably not likely.

    I would start by checking the switch leg connection. Sometimes people make this type of connection by connecting both switch legs directly to the switch and other times they tie the wires together with a pigtail and that pigtail is connected to the switch. I'm not sure how yours was wired but that's probably your issue.

    If you have them connected with a nut and pigtail, check to make sure the connection is solid. Pull the wire nut to see if its loose. If not, unscrew it and make sure the line is connected properly. Sometimes one line slips out and prevents a connection or the tip of a line cracks off, etc. Get everything good to go, tie them back up, put the nut back on and make sure the open end of the nut is facing down when you pack it into the box so it doesn't collect dust. You can tape the bottom too. Not a bad idea. You can run some tape around the switch once you get it working too.

    If you have both lines connected to the switch, I would put them on a pigtail - same as above.

    While you're in there with the power off, you may want to check your connection on the neutral line and the ground.

    If you're still not getting heat to that light, check the connection in the fixture or the bulbs if you haven't done so already.
    Last edited by Wild Bill ; 05-18-2020, 09:53 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • RDU Irish
    replied
    Originally posted by wizards8507 View Post
    Anybody good with electrical?

    I've been replacing light switches and I screwed something up. A single switch controls two lights on the front of the house. The switch works properly for one of the lights, but the other light is stuck on. What am I looking for?
    Did you take a pic before disconnecting the old switch? Did you check to make sure you had the right type of switch? Any time I have more than just one line involved I take a picture and do what I can to mark the lines b/c that crap gets complicated real quick.

    Leave a comment:


  • GowerND11
    replied
    Had a ton and a half of crushed white stone delivered to the house last Thursday for some landscaping. I removed some terribly stupid thorn bushes out front that the last owners had planted (they hated neighbors it's been said), took out the mulch, etc. Got the stone down, it looks really nice, and it accents our dark wooden fence well too.

    Now I need to buy some type of small border to go around the stone because I never thought about getting it at the start of the project, and we've already had kids ride their bikes through the stone haha.....

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Originally posted by wizards8507 View Post
    Anybody good with electrical?

    I've been replacing light switches and I screwed something up. A single switch controls two lights on the front of the house. The switch works properly for one of the lights, but the other light is stuck on. What am I looking for?
    Disclaimer....I'm not an electrician but
    The light is staying on because there is nothing to interrupt the power, meaning it's not wired correctly. If you have a similar setup somewhere else in the house take a look at it.

    Leave a comment:


  • wizards8507
    replied
    Originally posted by ab2cmiller View Post
    Is there another switch that also controls those lights?
    No.

    Leave a comment:


  • ab2cmiller
    replied
    Originally posted by wizards8507 View Post
    Anybody good with electrical?

    I've been replacing light switches and I screwed something up. A single switch controls two lights on the front of the house. The switch works properly for one of the lights, but the other light is stuck on. What am I looking for?
    Is there another switch that also controls those lights?

    Leave a comment:


  • wizards8507
    replied
    Anybody good with electrical?

    I've been replacing light switches and I screwed something up. A single switch controls two lights on the front of the house. The switch works properly for one of the lights, but the other light is stuck on. What am I looking for?

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Originally posted by NEIIrish View Post
    Nice work!
    Thanks, I'm hoping to find some larger limestone pieces to cap it with. The ones at the big box stores or too small which would leave quite a few joints. I don't think that would look good.

    Leave a comment:


  • NEIIrish
    replied
    Originally posted by Irish#1 View Post
    Well, here it is minus the cap to go on top. I have a little mortar to clean off but overall I'm happy. Saved myself close to a thousand bucks. Mason's make it look so easy!





    Nice work!

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Well, here it is minus the cap to go on top. I have a little mortar to clean off but overall I'm happy. Saved myself close to a thousand bucks. Mason's make it look so easy!





    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    Getting ready to build a small brick retaining wall approximately 18ft long and about 30" high. It will extend perpendicular to the garage and is to be more decorative than anything. Never have built something like this and have looked at some videos. Any mason's out there with any advice?

    Leave a comment:


  • no.1IrishFan
    replied
    Thought I’d give some of you who might not be aware some advice on your HVAC systems. Most HVAC systems manufactured before 2010 contain r22 Freon. Due to its environmental hazards it’s been being phased out for some time now. We’re told now that in 2020 it will no longer be available. If you can find someone who has it, it’s going to be VERY expensive. If your current system contains r410a(Puron) your fine. However, if your r22 system needs refrigerant after the cut off, your only option is to replace the ENTIRE HVAC SYSTEM.
    If you have a home warranty, ensure that your current plan covers this. If you don’t have a home warranty and have a system with r22, get a home warranty!

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    If it were me, I wouldn't worry about turning the yard into a skating rink. Think about the fun the kids could have. Since you don't want that, I would be curious as to how far it has dropped? I'd mark the current level and check it every day for a few days to see how fast you're losing water. Maybe it's slow enough that you can wait until the weather stays warm enough to melt the ice. Can you break up the ice on the cover? The only way to address this is to let it run its course or drop a pump in and start lowering a little at a time.

    Leave a comment:


  • SouthSideChiDomer
    replied
    Don't know if this is the right place to post this, but I could use some help and advice. It looks like our above ground pool has just sprang a leak. There is a rust spot that we have had for a while at the base, but it just started leaking water and creating a little ice build up on it. I realize the pool is probably done, but I just want to know if there is anything I can do to stop the leaking so it doesn't slowly turn our yard into a skating rink. I'm also a bit worried about the walls caving in if too much leaks out and the weight of the ice on the cover is too much.

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish#1
    replied
    That's why I said exact model. They change things all the time even within lines. Too bad the old bracket wouldn't work on the new one.

    Leave a comment:

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