Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

COVID-19

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Getting enough volunteers for the Phase III clinical trials in such new ways of boosting immune responses is another key. Amazing scientific achievement, though whether the less developed countries can benefit and avoid the ravages of the coming diseases is of concern.

    Comment


    • The course of a pandemic respiratory infection also aids vaccine development. A large enough number of patients got exposed to get results really quick. For some infections that are chronic/endemic it takes years to see that many exposures.

      Additionally the ability to go from DNA to sequencing targets to vaccine prototype is super short vs what we had a decade ago.

      Comment


      • The big thing to me is take a look at this afterwards and pinpoint exactly where you could speed up the vaccine production effort/initial containment. Imagine a world where we're rolling into phase 3 trials before wave 1 hits and were a month or 2 better at scaling up production.

        Figuring out how to have viral testing/PPE etc. Scaled up early and rational population surveilance and more rapid RCT rollout for therapeutics as well. Given globalization/human encroachment on animal habitats/climate change shifting animal habitats we're going to see another one of these in the next 20 to 30 years. And we could see something much more deadly.

        Comment


        • One big silver lining to all of this is that besides just the research that's gone into the science of MRNA vaccines, but the and billions of dollars spent in the MRNA vaccine production infrastructure. That investment may pay dividends for decades.
          Last edited by GoldenToTheGrave; 02-08-2021, 07:04 PM. Reason: Words
          "Yes, they deserved to die and I hope they burn in hell!"
          --Samuel L

          Comment


          • Originally posted by PerthDomer View Post
            The big thing to me is take a look at this afterwards and pinpoint exactly where you could speed up the vaccine production effort/initial containment. Imagine a world where we're rolling into phase 3 trials before wave 1 hits and were a month or 2 better at scaling up production.

            Figuring out how to have viral testing/PPE etc. Scaled up early and rational population surveilance and more rapid RCT rollout for therapeutics as well. Given globalization/human encroachment on animal habitats/climate change shifting animal habitats we're going to see another one of these in the next 20 to 30 years. And we could see something much more deadly.
            I heard a scientist on a podcast lamenting the fact that US didnít just roll out the cheaper rapid antigen tests nationwide and encourage everyone to test early in the process. He acknowledged there was a lot of false negatives but that if a person tested positive its pretty certain they are infected. He claimed the FDA insisted on rolling out the more expensive yet accurate PCR tests. Hindsight is 20/20 but that was an interesting case he made.

            Comment


            • One of the 1st things Biden did was use the DPA to buy a bunch of high fidelity rapid tests.

              Comment


              • Have to get thru this one first. Evolution happens at reproduction. The longer this virus hangs around and the higher the number of cases the more it will evolve. There are two equally likely events: covid evolves into something less virulent and simply disappears or becomes very manageable or it becomes more virulent and kills everyone on the planet.

                Historically pandemics or large scale infectious events happen twice a century. Last century was the anomaly. Of course there is the melting of the permaforst and all the germs/virus therein

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Valpodoc85 View Post
                  Have to get thru this one first. Evolution happens at reproduction. The longer this virus hangs around and the higher the number of cases the more it will evolve. There are two equally likely events: covid evolves into something less virulent and simply disappears or becomes very manageable or it becomes more virulent and kills everyone on the planet.

                  Historically pandemics or large scale infectious events happen twice a century. Last century was the anomaly. Of course there is the melting of the permaforst and all the germs/virus therein
                  I'm not sure scientists would agree with that. Doesn't history suggests viruses become less virulent more often than not?

                  Comment


                  • Really good information and observations guys. I've been going back and forth with a couple of Doctors that are highly engaged in research/vaccines for Covid. I wish I could share their e-mails but I think you are all on the same page.

                    My biggest takeaway from our correspondence is that Covid and variants are not going away anytime soon... if ever.

                    I was a little disappointed as I had hoped we might be done with this in the next 12-18 months. We need to manage expectations and be vigilant.

                    The science and technologies that has advanced in the past 12 months is nothing short of spectacular. I think that gives everyone hope and rightfully so.

                    As a corporate guy, this past year has really opened my eyes to the importance of science. I was hardly a troglodyte before but I hope Covid becomes a very important teaching tool for the future.

                    Best of luck to everyone and be safe.

                    Cheers and Go Irish!!

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Valpodoc85 View Post
                      Have to get thru this one first. Evolution happens at reproduction. The longer this virus hangs around and the higher the number of cases the more it will evolve. There are two equally likely events: covid evolves into something less virulent and simply disappears or becomes very manageable or it becomes more virulent and kills everyone on the planet.

                      Historically pandemics or large scale infectious events happen twice a century. Last century was the anomaly. Of course there is the melting of the permaforst and all the germs/virus therein
                      (Insert Jesse Pinkman "science b****" Gif)
                      Based Mullet Kid owns

                      Comment


                      • Viruses evolve to transmit better. Given covid spreads just as symptoms start or before. And for people who drive transmission (young folk) severe disease is pretty rare. B.1.1.7 is more deadly than OG COVID. It will get more or less deadly as a function of improving spread. We know higher viral loads = spread better and more deadly.

                        This could double in IFR and it'd be way worse for the health system, but you'd still have people saying it's a cold. Because the vast majority of those catching it would be ok.

                        Comment


                        • "Spread better", yes. Absolutely a natural selection type thing. "Get more deadly", no. That might or might not happen, but is a side issue. More deadly MIGHT come alongside with more successful attachment on the one hand, but killing the host goes the opposite way in terms of natural selection.

                          Comment


                          • Update: I took a rapid test on Monday which was negatie but the doctor told me to come back on Friday and take another. I did and took the molecular test. I still haven't got a results call which I understand is a good thing.

                            Anyway Im leaving self quarantine and I dont think I got it. Ill take that as a win.
                            "From Chaos comes Clarity"

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Old Man Mike View Post
                              "Spread better", yes. Absolutely a natural selection type thing. "Get more deadly", no. That might or might not happen, but is a side issue. More deadly MIGHT come alongside with more successful attachment on the one hand, but killing the host goes the opposite way in terms of natural selection.
                              Whenever I see a product claim its 99.99% effective at killing germs and bacteria, I cant help but think every single time.... what's that other 0.01 percent doing and how did it survive? It has an exponential growth rate and basically since it didn't die, this indicates its dna is capable of resisting that cleaning solution and able to go again as I assume the surface was saturated with the solution in testing situations.

                              Needless to say public bathrooms are a nightmare for me and contact time is a huge item of discussion in my house while cleaning :).
                              "From Chaos comes Clarity"

                              Comment


                              • I think of drug-resistant bacteria and its costs in procedures we won't be able to do, the infections which will rage as we lose our last line of defense.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X