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[Coaching Profile] Charlie Weis

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  • [Coaching Profile] Charlie Weis

    Charlie Weis
    Offensive Coordinator / Running Backs Coach
    NFL Coaching Experience: 15 Yrs (9 with Patriots)
    School: Notre Dame
    Born: Mar 30, 1956 Trenton New Jersey

    Personal

    Charlie Weis was born March 30, 1956, in Trenton, N.J. He excelled both athletically and academically at Middlesex (N.J.) High. He attended the University of Notre Dame, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in communications and education. While coaching in South Carolina, he earned his master’s degree in education. In 2003, Charlie and his wife Maura established the Hannah & Friends Foundation, dedicated to children affected by developmental disorders. In the spring of 2004, the first annual Hannah & Friends Celebrity Golf Classic was held to benefit the foundation. Charlie and Maura have two children, Charles Joseph and Hannah Margaret.

    Coaching

    Charlie Weis, a 26-year coaching veteran, including 15 seasons in the NFL, is enjoying his ninth season with the New England Patriots and his fifth as the team’s offensive coordinator. In 15 NFL seasons, his coaching contributions have helped produce three Super Bowl Championships, four conference titles and five division titles. Weis has experienced success at each stop in his coaching career and has gained widespread respect as one of the NFL’s most creative offensive coordinators.

    Throughout his career, Weis has shown the ability to develop successful offensive players through his teaching methods. He has helped to advance the careers of Curtis Martin, Keyshawn Johnson, Ben Coates and, most recently, two-time Super Bowl MVP quarterback Tom Brady. Under Weis’ tutelage, the former sixth-round draft choice has become one of the NFL’s premier signal callers in just three seasons as a starter. Including the playoffs, Brady has compiled a 40-12 record as a starting quarterback since stepping in early in 2001, at which time Weis was also serving as New England’s quarterbacks coach.

    Weis drew additional responsibilities mentoring the quarterbacks from 2001 to 2002, a role he accepted after suffering the personal loss of quarterbacks coach Dick Rehbein, one of his closest friends and coaching confidants, who died in August of 2001. That season, Drew Bledsoe started the first two games of the season before being sidelined with a serious chest injury. By the third week of the season, Weis was preparing Brady for his first NFL start, and over the course of the season, Brady blossomed into a Pro Bowl performer and earned the MVP award in Super Bowl XXXVI. From there, Brady continued to improve, leading the NFL with 28 touchdown passes in 2002, then turning in another Super Bowl MVP performance in 2003.

    In recent seasons, Weis’ offense has allowed young offensive players such as Brady, Deion Branch, David Givens and Kevin Faulk to develop. In addition to helping the Patriots’ young stars emerge, Weis’s offense has allowed veterans such as Troy Brown, Christian Fauria and David Patten enjoy resurgences in their careers. Brown set a franchise record with 101 receptions in 2001, earning his first Pro Bowl nod in his ninth season in the league. Fauria led the team with seven touchdowns in 2002 (his eighth professional season), while Patten’s 61 catches in 2002 were the most of his seven-year career.

    Weis also used contributions from a pair of 2002 draft picks to help the team to its second championship in 2003. In his second pro season, Branch led the team with 57 receptions, while fellow second-year player Givens paced the club with six receiving touchdowns. In the postseason, Givens added a pair of scores, while Branch’s 10 catches in Super Bowl XXXVIII tied for the third-most in Super Bowl history.

    Weis began his professional coaching career with the New York Giants in 1990. After working in the Giants pro personnel department in 1989, Weis was named defensive assistant and assistant special teams coach. In his first season on the Giants coaching staff, the Giants claimed the Super Bowl title with a 16-3 overall record. In 1991, Ray Handley took over as coach of the Giants and named Weis his running backs coach. After two seasons on Handley’s staff, Weis began a four-year stint in New England.

    In Weis’ previous tenure with the Patriots from 1993-96, he helped to develop some of the franchise’s best individual single-season performances from Coates, Martin and Terry Glenn, respectively. During his first four seasons in New England, he coached three different positions - tight ends, running backs and wide receivers. In 1993 and 1994, he served as the team’s tight ends coach, and in his second season at the position, Coates set an NFL record for receptions by a tight end with 96 and earned his first trip to the Pro Bowl. In 1995, Weis coached the Patriots’ running backs and was credited with developing Martin, a third-round ‘95 draft pick, into one of the premier running backs in the NFL. That year, Martin won Rookie of the Year honors and set franchise rushing records with 1,487 yards and 14 touchdowns. In 1996, Weis coached the team’s receivers, and under his tutelage, Glenn led the team and set an NFL rookie reception record with 90 catches for 1,132 yards and six touchdowns.

    From 1997 to 1999, Weis called the offensive plays for the New York Jets. In his first season with the Jets, New York improved from 1-15 in 1996 to 9-7 in 1997. The eight-game improvement was the best in franchise history. In 1998, Weis was named the offensive coordinator/wide receivers coach after a year of handling the dual responsibilities. By season’s end, his offense ranked among the greatest in franchise history and led the team to their first division title. The team scored 416 points, the second highest total in franchise history (419 points in 1968) and averaged 357.2 yards per game. It was the second-best season average in Jets history (368.5 ypg in 1985). Both of Weis’ starting receivers, Johnson (1,131) and Chrebet (1,083), eclipsed the 1,000-yard receiving plateau for the first time in their respective careers. It also marked the first time since 1986 that two Jets receivers reached that milestone in one season.

    In 1999, Weis’ offense produced the league’s second-leading rusher and the AFC’s fourth ranked receiver. Martin rushed for 1,464 yards, falling just 90 yards shy of the rushing title. Johnson led the team and established career-highs with 89 receptions for 1,170 yards. He earned his second consecutive Pro Bowl nod at the end of the season.

    Weis has enjoyed tremendous coaching success at all levels, including high school, college and in the pros. The Trenton native began his coaching career in 1979 at a high school in New Jersey. In 1985, he was hired as an assistant at the University of South Carolina, where he coached for four seasons before returning to New Jersey as the head coach at Franklin Township High in 1989. That year, he directed them to the New Jersey State Championship. In 1990, he launched his professional coaching career with the New York Giants and celebrated his first Super Bowl championship.

    URL: http://cachewww.patriots.com/team/index.cfm?ac=coachbio&bio=515
    Last edited by Irish Envy; 12-06-2004, 07:19 PM.

  • #2
    What makes you think this guy will be a great head coach? Sounds like another gerry faust in the making.

    Comment


    • #3
      Because he took an offense with basically zero superstar talent and turned them into two-time Super Bowl winners.

      And given the available candidates, Weis was the best choice. Clements would've been good too, but when was the last time the Bills won a Super Bowl? Gruden is overrated; notice that the Bucs are getting worse and worse the longer he coaches there? The first-season Super Bowl was really won by Dungy. Shanahan is equally overrated. Solich went 9-3 at a school with some of the weakest academic standards in the nation, and would've been in big trouble at Notre Dame. And Urban Meyer is about 8 months away from discovering that just because a spiffy new offense rips up Wyoming doesn't mean it's gonna rip up Auburn too.
      But hey, I once thought Rick Minter deserved a 3rd year, so what the hell do I know? :rolleyes:

      Comment


      • #4
        weis was a good choice. how can you say gerry faust when weis has taken an offense to the superbowl? he will bring offensive coaching experience and great offensive schemes to the program.
        "My only answer as to why the Marines get the toughest jobs is because the average Leatherneck is a much better fighter. He has far more guts, courage, and better officers... These boys out here have a pride in the Marine Corps and will fight to the end no matter what the cost." 2nd Lt. Richard C. Kennard, Peleliu, World War II

        Comment


        • #5
          I think Weis was a great pick over all the other candidates

          Comment


          • #6
            That's some signature ya got there, Irishgo8. Heisman trophy? National championship? :confused:

            Curb your enthusiasm, dude. We had talent this year, but to put 100% of the blame for a 6-6 record on the coaching is putting on blinders to reality. We have a lot of players returning next year with questionable talent and decision-making abilities, and they're going to have to adjust to a new coach, a new playbook, and a whole new attitude.

            A 6-6 squad of players does not win the title the next year just because they switched coaches. With expectations like yours, will a 7-5 or 8-4 debut make you start up FireCharlieWeis.com?
            But hey, I once thought Rick Minter deserved a 3rd year, so what the hell do I know? :rolleyes:

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Vince Young
              That's some signature ya got there, Irishgo8. Heisman trophy? National championship? :confused:

              Curb your enthusiasm, dude. We had talent this year, but to put 100% of the blame for a 6-6 record on the coaching is putting on blinders to reality. We have a lot of players returning next year with questionable talent and decision-making abilities, and they're going to have to adjust to a new coach, a new playbook, and a whole new attitude.

              A 6-6 squad of players does not win the title the next year just because they switched coaches. With expectations like yours, will a 7-5 or 8-4 debut make you start up FireCharlieWeis.com?
              lol. It is wishful thinking. I will change if it is concidere offensive though.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Vince Young
                :

                Curb your enthusiasm, dude. We had talent this year, but to put 100% of the blame for a 6-6 record on the coaching is putting on blinders to reality. We have a lot of players returning next year with questionable talent and decision-making abilities, and they're going to have to adjust to a new coach, a new playbook, and a whole new attitude.

                A 6-6 squad of players does not win the title the next year just because they switched coaches. With expectations like yours, will a 7-5 or 8-4 debut make you start up FireCharlieWeis.com?
                Ah, Mr. Young. A breath of fresh air. Great minds truly think alike.

                The roster lacks speed. You saw it against SC and Oregon State. ND must get faster on both sides of the ball to compete for a National Championship. The wins over Michigan and Tennessee were nice, but those teams are not SC, OU or UM. ND cannot hang with any of those guys right now.

                A new regime and experiened players will be nice, but freshmen who can contribute are going to be critical to any success in the next two years. Weis' recruiting efforts could pay off, but these last two classes could end up being hurtful in the long term. Quinn and Walker are a good base on offense. Building around them would be a start on O. On D, get as many DBs in here as possible. Fast, physical and tough. ND made Tyler Palko look like Ty Detmer.
                Third cousins. For Italians. That's like twin brothers with the Irish.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jiggafini19
                  Ah, Mr. Young. A breath of fresh air. Great minds truly think alike.
                  Careful with the "great minds" comment... I'm on-record as recently as yesterday saying that Ty deserved one more year. :nanana1:
                  But hey, I once thought Rick Minter deserved a 3rd year, so what the hell do I know? :rolleyes:

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Although i agree i would have given ty another year...but that is over and i think in the long run may be the better decision

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