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Irish YJ
09-11-2018, 12:17 AM
Not personally losing my religion (I believe what I believe, went through Catholic school all my life, and argued the entire time). At least not more than I already have...

Found the below article interesting. Not profound, but not many MSM articles on the topic the last year. I wish Pew did more work around the details....

With all the bad press, I've heard from friends and family (many that are truly devout Catholics) that are falling away. I've never thought of the Pope as infallible, the Church as an absolute when it comes to spirituality, the Bible as anything but a group of writings picked by a mix of folks trying to get it right (if you know how the writings came together), or that Catholicism was THE correct version of Christ's teaching.

Young Christians are leaving the church ‚€“ Here‚€™s why | Fox News (http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2018/09/09/young-christians-are-leaving-church-here-s-why.html)

Why America's 'nones' don't identify with a religion | Pew Research Center (http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/08/08/why-americas-nones-dont-identify-with-a-religion/)

Why some Americans left religion behind | Pew Research Center (http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/08/24/why-americas-nones-left-religion-behind/)

A new, 2018 Pew Research Center Report polled a growing group in America: “religious nones.” This group describes themselves as “nothing in particular” when asked if they identify with a specific religious group. The vast majority are ex-Christians, and most are under the age of 35. Pew asked a representative sample of these “religious nones” why they now reject any religious affiliation and provided respondents with six possible responses.

According to the Pew report, most “religious nones” left because they “question a lot of religious teaching” (51 percent agreed with this statement), or because they “don’t like the positions churches take on social/political issues” (46 percent agreed with this statement). To a lesser extent, “nones” agreed with the statements, “I don’t like religious organizations” (34 percent), “I don’t like religious leaders” (31 percent), or “Religion is irrelevant to me” (26 percent).

From this data, one might infer that Christians leave the faith because they no longer agree with the teaching of the Church or that they don’t like religious organizations or leaders.

But this is not why young Christians are leaving the church.

One glaring statistic was largely overlooked in the latest data collected by the Pew Research Center. When religious “nones” were asked to identify the most important reason for not affiliating with a religion, the largest response was that none of the six responses provided by Pew were actually very important. In this poll, Pew did not allow respondents to answer in their own words. So, even though respondents searched for an answer that approximated their experience, most didn’t believe that any of the reasons offered by Pew were very important to them when deciding to abandon their religious identity.

What, then, is the real reason young Christians (and other religious believers) leave the faith? The answer lies in a prior, 2016 Pew Research Center survey which allowed respondents to answer in their own words. In this study, most “nones” said they no longer identified with a religious group because they no longer believed it was true. When asked why they didn’t believe, many said their views about God had “evolved” and some reported having a “crisis of faith.” Their specific explanations included the following statements:

“Learning about evolution when I went away to college”
“Religion is the opiate of the people”
“Rational thought makes religion go out the window”
“Lack of any sort of scientific or specific evidence of a creator”
“I just realized somewhere along the line that I didn’t really believe it”
“I’m doing a lot more learning, studying and kind of making decisions myself rather than listening to someone else.”

The data from this 2016 study may explain why ex-Christians “question a lot of religious teaching,” as reported in the 2018 study. The teaching they question seems to be about the existence of God, and this is consistent with the explanations offered by ex-Christians in a variety of other recent studies. When Christians walk away from the faith, more often than not, it’s due to some form of intellectual skepticism. Ex-Christians often describe religious beliefs as innately blind or unreasonable.

But that doesn’t accurately reflect the rich, evidential history of Christianity. The psalmist appealed to the design and fine-tuning of the universe to demonstrate the existence of God (Psalm 19:1). Jesus appealed to both eyewitness testimony (John 16:8) and the indirect evidence of his miracles (John 10:38) to argue for the authority of his statements. The disciples identified themselves as eyewitnesses and appealed to their observations of the Resurrection to make the case for the Deity of Jesus (Acts 4:33).

Ex-Christians often leave the Church because they don’t think anyone in the Church can answer their questions or make a case. It’s time for believers to accept their responsibility to explain what Christianity proposes and why these propositions are true, especially when interacting with young people who have legitimate questions. Rather than embracing a blind or unreasonable faith, Christians must develop an informed, forensic faith that can stand up in the marketplace of ideas.

We know why young Christians are leaving. Now it’s time to give them a reason to stay.

Irish YJ
01-09-2019, 07:30 PM
https://www.reuters.tv/v/PNf1/2018/12/25/why-generation-z-is-less-religious-than-ever

loomis41973
01-10-2019, 09:26 PM
Lost mine long ago.

Irish YJ
01-10-2019, 10:11 PM
Lost mine long ago.

Growing up in Catholic hoods, and going to Catholic schools 1-12, I've seen my share of good and bad from the institution. I'll always be "Catholic" at heart, but I've seen far too much bad (firsthand and otherwise) from the institution to ever put my faith in it. I absolutely believe in God, just not a lot of the humans tasked with shepherding the flock.

loomis41973
01-10-2019, 10:25 PM
Growing up in Catholic hoods, and going to Catholic schools 1-12, I've seen my share of good and bad from the institution. I'll always be "Catholic" at heart, but I've seen far too much bad (firsthand and otherwise) from the institution to ever put my faith in it. I absolutely believe in God, just not a lot of the humans tasked with shepherding the flock.

Pretty much sums up my feelings.

I met more than my share of two-faced, fake "Catholics" to last a lifetime. The gossip and envy is unreal.


As someone who went to church more than once a week for over half my life, I find todays church nothing more than a money grabbing bunch of BS.


If anyone in the ND area would love a great story about GCC hit me up on PM. What a sad ass joke that place is.

Irish YJ
01-10-2019, 11:02 PM
Pretty much sums up my feelings.

I met more than my share of two-faced, fake "Catholics" to last a lifetime. The gossip and envy is unreal.


As someone who went to church more than once a week for over half my life, I find todays church nothing more than a money grabbing bunch of BS.


If anyone in the ND area would love a great story about GCC hit me up on PM. What a sad ass joke that place is.

I think most churches/religions are all about the money. It's pretty disgusting. Some hide it better. I've seen the archdiocese close down to many "poor" parishes where they were probably needed most, but just couldn't bring in the revenue.

Aside from all of the child sex crap, what has turned me off most about the Catholic Church was how political (internal politics, not gov politics) the parishes became in the 80s and later. And I saw too many very good priests pushed out and replaced by more politically tied in priests that were incredibly bad for the flock.

What is GCC? You talking about ND's Grad Consulting Careers?